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Content tagged with "tree"

Coming Soon to a Landscape Near You

You may have noticed some flowering trees already this spring: the white blooms of serviceberry, plums and ornamental pears and the pink of Japanese magnolia and peaches.

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Common Alder

Alnus serrulata
Alder is a good plant to know—its flowers and fruits are eaten by wildlife, its thick roots prevent erosion while enriching the soil, its bark has a long history of medical uses and the dried female catkins, which look like tiny pinecones, are useful in craft projects and in jewelry!

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Communities of Trees

This content is archived
Branch Out Missouri helps keep our cities green.

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Image of a corkwood

Corkwood

Leitneria floridana
This rare and unusual small tree doesn’t have a problem with having its feet wet for long periods of time, but it grows rarer as its swampy habitat is converted to cropland.

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Image of cottonwood leaf

Cottonwood

Populus deltoides
Named for the cottony fluffs of hairs attached to its tiny seeds, cottonwood thrives in moist lowlands near streams and rivers. It is Missouri’s fastest-growing native tree but pays for that distinction by being relatively short-lived.

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cucumber magnolia tree

Cucumber Magnolia

Magnolia acuminata
Also called the cucumbertree magnolia, this is an impressive, large, broad-spreading shade tree native to southern Missouri. It is often cultivated in the eastern United States because, compared to more southern magnolias, it is relatively cold-hardy.

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Photo shows declining black walnut tree

Declining Black Walnut Tree

Black walnut trees in Missouri can display die-back for many other reasons besides TCD.

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Photo of a vial of walnut twig beetles.

Don't Accidentally Spread TCD

Photo of a vial of walnut twig beetles.

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downy serviceberry

Downy Serviceberry (Serviceberry)

Amelanchier arborea
This tall shrub or small tree is found throughout most of Missouri in open or rocky woods. The showy white flowers are among the first of the early spring trees and shrubs to bloom. The striking flowers, the purplish, often sweet berries and the brilliant fall color make serviceberry an attractive landscaping tree.

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