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Content tagged with "tree health"

Branch flagging on chinquapin oak

Branch Flagging

Branch flagging on chinquapin oak.

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Photo of tree-branch flagging

Branch Flagging Slide Show

This tree displays branch flagging, which can have many causes. In this case, female periodical cicadas cut the tree's twigs with their ovipositors in the process of laying their eggs. The small cuts weakened the twigs, which turned brown, then broke during strong winds.

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Photo of tree-branch flagging

Broken Twig Syndrome?

Have you found yourself picking up broken tree branch tips from your lawn recently, only to find your lawn cluttered with them again the next day?

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Branch flagging on chinquapin oak

Brown patches in trees may be result of cicadas, scale insects

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Egg-laying and feeding behavior of these insects damages individual tree branches.

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Deer Hunters Beware!

Firewood looks harmless, but it can harbor the emerald ash borer, a devastating forest pest. Hunters are urged not to move firewood to and from their camps. Instead, buy firewood locally and burn it all before returning home.

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Although TCD has not been detected in Missouri, we can estimate its potential economic impact. This four-page bulletin overviews the losses.

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Photo of European wood wasp female emerging from wood

European Wood Wasp (Emerging Female)

This invasive insect lives for about a year as a grublike larva inside the trunks of trees, then pupates, transforming into an adult. In our area, new adults would probably emerge from tree trunks July through September.

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Photo of male and female European wood wasps on pine stump

European Wood Wasp (Sirex Woodwasp)

European wood wasp, female (left) and male (right). This species is known to cause the death of up to 80 percent of the pine trees in an area, and it could soon arrive in Missouri. Help protect our pines by learning how to identify this troublesome insect.

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Photo of male and female European wood wasps on pine stump

European Wood Wasp (Sirex Woodwasp)

Sirex noctilio
The European wood wasp, or sirex woodwasp, is known to cause the death of up to 80 percent of the pine trees in an area, and it could soon arrive in Missouri. Help protect our pines by learning how to identify this troublesome insect.

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Photo of European wood wasp larva in gallery in pine wood

European Wood Wasp Larva

The larvae of European wood wasps are creamy white, legless, with a dark spine at the hind end, and thus look very much like the larvae of our native horntail species. They have a symbiotic fungus that causes the tree tissues to deteriorate; the larvae feed on the fungus as they tunnel through the wood. Unfortunately, this process kills the tree entirely.

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