Content tagged with "swallowtail"

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Photo of an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Papilio glaucus
The beautiful eastern tiger swallowtail ranges across Missouri and is equally at home in forests or in city landscapes. More

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Black-Form Female

Photo of an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Black-Form Female
Some females are yellow with black stripes, similar to males; others, like this individual, are black with darker black stripes. More

Giant Swallowtail

Image of giant swallowtail
Adults are avid flower visitors and are sometimes found at mud puddles. More

Giant Swallowtail

Photo of a Giant Swallowtail, Wings Spread
Papilio cresphontes
This swallowtail is the largest butterfly in our state. In Florida, the larvae are a pest in citrus orchards, but here in Missouri, they feed primarily on prickly ash and hop tree, plants provided by nature. More

Giant Swallowtail, Wings Folded

Photo of a Giant Swallowtail, Wings Folded
The undersides of the wings are primarily yellow, with black, blue and red markings. More

Giant Swallowtail, Wings Spread

Photo of a Giant Swallowtail, Wings Spread
The giant swallowtail is the largest butterfly in Missouri. The overall color of the wings (top side) and body is dark blackish-brown, with bands composed of several yellow spots. More

Pipevine Swallowtail (Blue Swallowtail)

Photo of a Pipevine Swallowtail, Wings Folded
Battus philenor
The pipevine swallowtail is ignored by most predators because of its acrid body juices. Several other butterflies look strikingly similar! More

Spicebush Swallowtail

Image of a spicebush swallowtail
Image of a spicebush swallowtail. More

Spicebush Swallowtail

Photo of a Spicebush Swallowtail, Male, Wings Spread
Pterourus troilus
The caterpillars are smooth and pretty green, with weird eyespots on a hump well behind the actual head. The winged adults are striking, too: black with beautiful iridescent blue and green on the hindwings. More