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Content tagged with "summer wildflower"

Photo of beaked hawkweed flowers.

Beaked Hawkweed

Hieracium gronovii
A native wildflower of forests, blufftops, glades, pastures, and roadsides, beaked hawkweed looks something like a hairy, yellow-flowering chicory. It is found mostly south of the Missouri River.

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Photo of beaked hawkweed plant showing basal leaves, stalk, and flowers.

Beaked Hawkweed

Beaked hawkweed is a very hairy, usually single-stemmed perennial herb. The flowerheads appear in open clusters and are borne at the tips of the stems. The basal leaves are broadly obovate, very hairy, and rough, ranging in length to 8 inches. The stem leaves are smaller, becoming sessile, and also very hairy.

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Photo of beaked hawkweed flowers.

Beaked Hawkweed (Flowers)

A native wildflower of forests, blufftops, glades, pastures, and roadsides, beaked hawkweed looks something like a hairy, yellow-flowering chicory. It is found mostly south of the Missouri River.

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Photo of beaked hawkweed spent flowers and seed heads.

Beaked Hawkweed (Seed Heads)

Beaked hawkweed is a native wildflower found mostly south of the Missouri River, in rocky, dry, open woods, fields, and ravines.

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Photo of Bradbury beebalm plant with pale flowers

Beebalm (Bradbury Beebalm)

Monarda bradburiana (sometimes called M. russeliana)
Also called horsemint and wild bergamot, beebalm is a showy, fragrant plant that is a favorite of native plant gardeners. It’s also a favorite of Missouri’s butterflies!

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Photo of Bradbury beebalm plant with pale flowers

Beebalm (Bradbury Beebalm)

The flowers of Bradbury beebalm are often white or pale lavender with purple spots. Note the unbranching stems and the sessile (stalkless) leaves. Also called horsemint and wild bergamot, this showy, fragrant plant is a favorite of native plant gardeners.

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Photo of Bradbury beebalm plant with pinkish flowers

Beebalm (Bradbury Beebalm)

Bradbury beebalm is a clump-forming perennial with square, unbranched stems. All parts of the plant have a pleasant aroma. Flowers normally in 1 terminal cluster, subtended by many small leaves that frequently are rose-purple. The flowers themselves vary from white to lavender to pinkish.

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Photo of beefsteak plant showing upper leaves and flower cluster

Beefsteak Plant

Introduced from Asia as an ornamental, beefsteak plant is common in moist or dry wooded bottomlands, open valley pastures, and along trails, railroads, and roadsides. It is edible, and red forms of it are often grown in herb gardens.

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Photo of beefsteak plant showing upper leaves and flower cluster

Beefsteak Plant (Wild Basil; Rattlesnake Weed; Shiso)

Perilla frutescens
Introduced as an ornamental, this native of Asia is common in moist or dry wooded bottomlands, open valley pastures, and along trails, railroads, and roadsides. Beefsteak plant is edible, and red forms of it are often grown in herb gardens.

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Photo of bird's-foot trefoil, closeup of flower cluster.

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Lotus corniculatus
Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are cloverlike, with two leafy stipules at the base of each.

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