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Content tagged with "summer wildflower"

Photo of ashy sunflower stem showing two opposite, sessile leaves.

Ashy Sunflower (Leaves)

The leaves of ashy sunflower are opposite, sessile, broadly ovate, stiff, and densely gray-hairy, with inconspicuous teeth.

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Photo of many blooming ashy sunflower plants, showing gray-green leaves.

Ashy Sunflower Colony

Ashy sunflower is a native perennial wildflower that usually grows in colonies. It’s most often encountered in prairies in all but the southeastern quarter of the state.

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Photo of many blooming ashy sunflower plants, showing gray-green leaves.

Ashy Sunflower Colony

Colonies of ashy sunflowers, with their sunny yellow blossoms and grayish foliage, make a striking late summer display in our native tallgrass prairies.

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Photo of autumn sneezeweed flowerheads, closeup.

Autumn Sneezeweed (Common Sneezeweed)

Autumn sneezeweed is a late-blooming perennial with conspicuously winged stems. The flowerheads have yellow, rounded disks. The ray flowers are fan-shaped, yellow, and notched.

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Photo of many autumn sneezeweed plants blooming in a grassy field.

Autumn Sneezeweed (Common Sneezeweed)

Autumn sneezeweed grows in moist areas in meadows, prairies, ditches, and along streams. Like other sneezeweeds, it contains toxic, bitter substances, and grazing animals, including cattle, avoid eating it.

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Photo of autumn sneezeweed flowerheads, side view, with blue background.

Autumn Sneezeweed (Common Sneezeweed)

Sneezeweeds were used historically by Native Americans and pioneers as snuff. Inhaling the dried, powdered disk florets caused violent, prolonged sneezing, and people did this as a way of alleviating colds, stuffy noses, headache, and other maladies.

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Photo of autumn sneezeweed flowerheads, closeup.

Autumn Sneezeweed (Common Sneezeweed)

Helenium autumnale
Autumn sneezeweed is a late-blooming perennial with conspicuously winged stems. The flowerheads have yellow, domed disks. The ray flowers are fan-shaped, yellow, and notched.

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Photo of bastard toadflax plant with flowers

Bastard Toadflax (False Toadflax)

Bastard toadflax is a perennial herb with yellowish-green foliage and smooth, upright stems. It grows and flowers on dry or rocky uplands, glades, and prairies, under the hottest conditions, May through July.

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Photo of bastard toadflax plant with flowers

Bastard Toadflax (False Toadflax)

Comandra umbellata (formerly C. richardsiana)
Despite its coarse-sounding name, bastard toadflax is one of the hundreds of wildflowers that bejewel our native prairies. A perennial herb with yellowish-green foliage and smooth, upright stems, it grows and flowers under the hottest conditions.

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Photo of bastard toadflax, or false toadflax, plant with flowers

Bastard Toadflax (False Toadflax)

The flowers of bastard toadflax are whitish or cream-colored and grow in small, flattened clusters at the tops of stalks. The leaves are narrow, oblong, alternate, stalkless, to 1½ inches long, and yellowish green on both sides. The plant usually only grows to 1 foot high.

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