Content tagged with "summer wildflower"

Beebalm (Bradbury Beebalm)

Photo of Bradbury beebalm plant with pale flowers
Monarda bradburiana (sometimes called M. russeliana)
Also called horsemint and wild bergamot, beebalm is a showy, fragrant plant that is a favorite of native plant gardeners. It’s also a favorite of Missouri’s butterflies! More

Beefsteak Plant

Photo of beefsteak plant showing upper leaves and flower cluster
Introduced from Asia as an ornamental, beefsteak plant is common in moist or dry wooded bottomlands, open valley pastures, and along trails, railroads, and roadsides. It is edible, and red forms of it are often grown in herb gardens. More

Beefsteak Plant (Wild Basil; Rattlesnake Weed; Shiso)

Photo of beefsteak plant showing upper leaves and flower cluster
Perilla frutescens
Introduced as an ornamental, this native of Asia is common in moist or dry wooded bottomlands, open valley pastures, and along trails, railroads, and roadsides. Beefsteak plant is edible, and red forms of it are often grown in herb gardens. More

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers
Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are trifoliate, with two leafy stipules at the base of each. More

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers
Bird’s-foot trefoil produces its bright golden yellow flowers from May to September. A native of Europe, it has a worldwide distribution. It is used as a low-growing groundcover, soil stabilizer, and forage and cover crop. More

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Photo of bird's-foot trefoil, closeup of flower cluster.
The flowers of bird's-foot trefoil grow in umbels, at the tips of the stalks, and have the typical configuration of pea flowers. This plant blooms May–September. More

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Photo of bird's-foot trefoil, closeup of flower cluster.
Lotus corniculatus
Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are cloverlike, with two leafy stipules at the base of each. More

Black Medick

Photo of black medick closeup of cloverlike yellow flowerhead
Medicago lupulina
The small, cloverlike flowering heads and trifoliate leaves of black medick are clues that this plant is in the Fabaceae, the bean or pea family. An introduced, weedy species, it is closely related to alfalfa. More

Black Medick

Photo of black medick, a yellow, cloverlike wildflower, held in a hand
Black medick occurs in fields, lawns, waste places, and along roads and railroads. A native of Eurasia and Africa, it was introduced and has naturalized across much of North America. It is a nutritious but low-yielding legume for grazing animals and is not much planted in our area. More

Black Medick (Flower)

Photo of black medick closeup of cloverlike yellow flowerhead
The small, cloverlike flowering heads and trifoliate leaves of black medick are clues that this plant is in the Fabaceae, the bean or pea family. An introduced, weedy species, it is closely related to alfalfa. More