Content tagged with "sturgeon"

"One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish"

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We almost lost our biggest fish, but Missouri’s lake sturgeon are making a slow comeback. More

Back Cover

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Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) Pallid sturgeon live in the Missouri, Mississippi and Lower Yellowstone rivers. Sturgeons evolved during the Paleozoic Era and are well adapted to fast flowing, muddy water. More

Back Cover

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On the back cover and right is a lake sturgeon by Noppadol Paothong. The largest of Missouri’s three sturgeons, it is rare and endangered in our state. More

Commercial Shovelnose Fishing Restricted

Shovelnose sturgeon illustration
In a nationwide effort to protect declining populations of the federally endangered pallid sturgeon, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) ruled in early October 2010 that shovelnose sturgeon must be treated as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act because of their similarity in appearance to the pallid sturgeon. More

Fight for Survival

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Long-lived sturgeon face many challenges. More

Hatchery-Raised Lake Sturgeon

Hatchery-Raised Lake Sturgeon
This lake sturgeon was raised at MDC’s Lost Valley Fish Hatchery near Warsaw before it became one of 12,000 released in September 2012 into rivers feeding the Missouri River. This six-inch youngster can potentially live 150 years and grow to eight feet long and more than 300 pounds. Young fish like this have black and brown mottled color. Adults turn chocolate brown or tan. More

Holding Pallid Sturgeon

A photograph of a researcher, standing in a boat, holding a 3-foot sturgeon
Resource Science Assistant Thomas Huffmon holds a pallid sturgeon. More

Lake Sturgeon

Lake sturgeon illustration
Lake sturgeon are rare and endangered in Missouri. More

Lake Sturgeon

Lake sturgeon illustration
Acipenser fulvenscens
The largest of Missouri’s three sturgeons is rare and endangered in our state. One way to identify it is by its conical (not shovel-nosed) snout. And despite its name, in our state this fish is almost always found in big rivers—not lakes. More