Content tagged with "spring wildflower"

Cattails

Photo of several cattail flowering stalks
Missouri’s cattails are all tall wetland plants with narrow, upright leaves emerging from a thick base, and a central stalk bearing a brown, sausage-shaped flower spike. More

Cattails

Photo of a dense stand of cattail plants
Cattails are important wetland plants that provide food, shelter, and nesting places for a variety of animals, including insects, young fish, frogs, muskrat, beaver, many bird species, and more. They also help stabilize soil. More

Celandine Poppy

Photo of celandine poppy plant and flowers
The showy, bright yellow flowers of celandine poppy really stand out in the shady woods and valleys where this plant grows. You should consider this species when you are planting a shade garden! More

Celandine Poppy (Wood Poppy)

Photo of celandine poppy plant and flowers
Stylophorum diphyllum
The showy, bright yellow flowers of celandine poppy really stand out in the shady woods and valleys where this plant grows. You should consider this species when you are planting a shade garden! More

Celestial Lily (Prairie Iris; Prairie Pleatleaf; Prairie Celestial)

Photo of a celestial lily, or prairie pleatleaf iris, in bloom.
Nemastylis geminiflora
Celestial lily, in the iris family, blooms only in the morning. Its showy, lavender-blue flowers shine like six-pointed stars on glades and prairies in southern Missouri and the eastern Ozarks. More

Celestial Lily (Prairie Pleatleaf Iris)

Photo of a celestial lily, or prairie pleatleaf iris, in bloom.
Celestial lily, in the iris family, blooms only in the morning. Its showy, lavender-blue flowers shine like six-pointed stars on glades and prairies in southern Missouri and the eastern Ozarks. More

Celestial Lily (Prairie Pleatleaf Iris)

Photo of a celestial lily, with insects visiting the flower.
Bees, flies, and other insects gather nectar from the flowers, pollinating them in the process. Celestial lily is not common but is sometimes found in large colonies on glades in the shade of eastern red cedars or Ashe’s junipers. More

Chinese Yam

Photo of Chinese yam showing leaves and bulbils
Dioscorea oppositifolia (sometimes called D. batatas)
Similar to kudzu, Chinese yam is an aggressive vine that overtakes nearly everything within reach that stands still long enough! Learn more about this invasive plant—and please don’t plant it! More

Chinese Yam (Bulbils and Leaves)

Photo of Chinese yam showing leaves and bulbils
New vines quickly sprout from the bulbils of Chinese yam. These drop off the vine and are carried to new locations by water or rodents or in topsoil moved for construction purposes. Even a small piece of a bulbil will sprout into a new vine, the way a small piece of a potato can create a new plant. The bulbils can overwinter and form new vines in spring. More

Chinese Yam (Bulbils)

Photo of Chinese yam vine showing bulbils
Although Chinese yam is not known to produce seed in the United States, it produces bulbils, which resemble tiny Irish potatoes and are not technically fruits, in the leaf axils. More