Content tagged with "spring wildflower"

Butterfly Pea

Photo of butterfly pea plant with flowers
Clitoria mariana
Butterfly pea is a low, shrubby, or twining perennial in the pea family, with showy, butterfly-like flowers. The leaves are compound with three leaflets. This species grows in the southern parts of Missouri, in acid soils. More

Carolina False Dandelion

Photo of Carolina false dandelion flowerhead.
Pyrrhopappus carolinianus
One of several native plants called dandelions, Carolina false dandelion is an annual with sulphur yellow flowers and puffy seedheads. More

Carolina False Dandelion (Basal Leaves)

Photo of Carolina false dandelion basal leaves.
The basal leaves of Carolina false dandelion are either entire or pinnatifid (like dandelion leaves), and they often have disappeared by flowering time. More

Carolina False Dandelion (Flowerhead)

Photo of Carolina false dandelion flowerhead.
The flowerheads of Carolina false dandelion are usually solitary, terminal, like those of dandelion but bright sulphur yellow. The inner florets appear dark-flecked from brownish fused anther bases, which surround the style and stigma. It blooms May–October. More

Carolina Larkspur (Prairie Larkspur)

Photo of Carolina larkspur plants with flowers
Delphinium carolinianum
Small blue, lavender, or white flowers shaped like cornucopias dance along the tall stems of this Carolina larkspur, which grows in prairies and grasslands. More

Carolina Larkspur (Prairie Larkspur)

Photo of Carolina larkspur plants with flowers
Small blue, lavender, or white flowers shaped like cornucopias dance along the tall stems of this Carolina larkspur, which grows in prairies and grasslands. More

Cattail Plants

Photo of several cattail plants all connected to single runner
Cattails can be used in an amazing variety of ways—by people all over the world—for food, fiber, pillow stuffing, basketry, roof thatching, and paper pulp. Researchers who study how people use plants are called ethnobotanists, and they have fascinating stories to tell. More

Cattail Plants

Photo of several cattail plants all connected to single runner
Cattails can spread quickly. Where wet soil is disturbed to bare mud, they can quickly colonize, hold soil in place, increase siltation, and impede water flow, eventually filling in the wet place. They can be nuisance plants in lakes and ponds, crowding out other plants, filling in old shallow ponds, attracting muskrats to dams, and impeding rainwater discharge on spillways. More

Cattail Roots And Shoots

Photo of cattail root system showing rhizomes and new shoots
All parts of cattails are edible and have been used as food worldwide. The nutritious, starchy rhizomes are eaten raw, cooked, or dried and ground into a flour. Roots can be made into a jelly. You can peel off the outer portion of tender young shoots and eat them like asparagus. When the flower spike is immature and still green, you can peel away the leaf sheath protecting it and cook and eat it like corn on the cob. You can shake the pollen from mature plants into a bag and use it to supplement flour in pancakes, breads, and other dishes. More

Cattails

Photo of several cattail flowering stalks
Missouri’s cattails are all tall wetland plants with narrow, upright leaves emerging from a thick base, and a central stalk bearing a brown, sausage-shaped flower spike. More