Content tagged with "spring wildflower"

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers
Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are trifoliate, with two leafy stipules at the base of each. More

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers
Bird’s-foot trefoil produces its bright golden yellow flowers from May to September. A native of Europe, it has a worldwide distribution. It is used as a low-growing groundcover, soil stabilizer, and forage and cover crop. More

Bird’s-Foot Violet

Photo of bird's-foot violet (bicolored form)
Viola pedata
Also called "pansy violet" and "hens and roosters," this spring wildflower can make a glade or bluff top heavenly with its pretty lavender and purple "faces." When you see your first big colony of bird's-foot violets, you will probably never forget it. More

Bird’s-Foot Violet (Purple and Lavender Form)

Photo of bird's-foot violet (bicolored form)
One of the color variations of bird’s-foot violet has 2 deep purple petals on top, and 3 lavender petals below. Also called “pansy violet” and “hens and roosters,” this spring wildflower can make a glade or bluff top heavenly with its pretty lavender and purple “faces.” When you see your first big colony of bird’s-foot violets, you will probably never forget it. More

Black Medick

Photo of black medick closeup of cloverlike yellow flowerhead
Medicago lupulina
The small, cloverlike flowering heads and trifoliate leaves of black medick are clues that this plant is in the Fabaceae, the bean or pea family. An introduced, weedy species, it is closely related to alfalfa. More

Black Medick

Photo of black medick, a yellow, cloverlike wildflower, held in a hand
Black medick occurs in fields, lawns, waste places, and along roads and railroads. A native of Eurasia and Africa, it was introduced and has naturalized across much of North America. It is a nutritious but low-yielding legume for grazing animals and is not much planted in our area. More

Black Medick (Flower)

Photo of black medick closeup of cloverlike yellow flowerhead
The small, cloverlike flowering heads and trifoliate leaves of black medick are clues that this plant is in the Fabaceae, the bean or pea family. An introduced, weedy species, it is closely related to alfalfa. More

Black Mustard

Photo of black mustard plant growing in cracked pavement
A native of Eurasia, black mustard is weedy and grows in fields, waste places, roadsides, and other disturbed areas. Until it was recently replaced by another species (brown mustard, which also is naturalized in Missouri) black mustard was the chief source of seed used in making table mustard. More

Black Mustard

Photo of black mustard plants on the edge of a field
Black mustard can grow to 5 feet tall. Next time you breeze past weedy black mustard on the highway or spot it in a fallow field, think of how important this and other mustards are to the world economy – and to your dinner table. More

Black Mustard

Photo of black mustard flower cluster
Brassica nigra
Next time you breeze past weedy black mustard on the highway or spot it in a fallow field, think of how important this and other mustards are to the world economy – and to your dinner table. More