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Content tagged with "snapping turtle"

Image of alligator snapping turtle

Alligator Snapping Turtle

Macrochelys temminckii
In Missouri, alligator snapping turtles are protected, and it is illegal to harvest them.

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black and white illustration of alligator snapping turtle

Alligator Snapping Turtle Illustration

Larger, heavier, and rougher-looking than the common snapping turtle, the rare alligator snapping turtle is protected, and harvest is illegal in Missouri. Check Missouri Turtle Regulations for more details.

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Image of alligator snapping turtle, dorsal view

Alligator Snapping Turtle, Dorsal View

Alligator snapping turtle, dorsal view.

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Image of alligator snapping turtle, ventral view

Alligator Snapping Turtle, Ventral View

Alligator snapping turtle, ventral view.

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black and white illustration of common snapping turtle, side view

Common Snapping Turtle Illustration

The common snapping turtle is found statewide in Missouri, and it is legal to harvest. Check Missouri Turtle Regulations for more details.

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Image of common snapping turtle, dorsal view

Common Snapping Turtle, Dorsal View

Common snapping turtle, dorsal view.

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Image of common snapping turtle, ventral view

Common Snapping Turtle, Ventral View

Common snapping turtle, ventral view.

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Photo of a snapping turtle walking on land with algae on shell.

Snapping Turtle (Common Snapping Turtle)

A large aquatic turtle with a big pointed head, long thick tail, and small lower shell, the snapping turtle is common throughout the state, anywhere there is permanent water. Often algae or mud covers its shell.

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Photo of a snapping turtle walking among plants near a pond.

Snapping Turtle (Common Snapping Turtle)

Females often travel overland during egg-laying season and often are killed by cars. Both sexes travel overland seeking a new home if their pond dries up.

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Photo of a snapping turtle on grass gaping at camera.

Snapping Turtle (Common Snapping Turtle)

Snapping turtles occur statewide and are common in farm ponds, marshes, swamps, sloughs, rivers, and reservoirs — anywhere there is permanent water. They prefer bodies of water with a mud bottom, abundant aquatic vegetation, and submerged logs.

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