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Content tagged with "snake"

Orange-Striped Ribbonsnake (Western Ribbon Snake)

Thamnophis proximus proximus
Our subspecies of western ribbonsnake is named for the attractive orange (or yellowish) stripes running the length of its body. A member of the gartersnake group, this species is found statewide, but seldom far from water.

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Osage Copperhead

Video of an Osage copperhead in the wild.

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Image of an osage copperhead

Osage Copperhead

Agkistrodon contortrix phaeogaster
Copperheads are pit vipers, with an opening on each side of the head and (in daylight) eyes with catlike, vertical pupils (our nonvenomous snakes have round pupils).

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Photo of a plains gartersnake taken in Lakewood, Colorado.

Plains Gartersnake

The plains gartersnake is an attractive, medium-sized snake. It differs from other gartersnakes by usually having a yellowish-orange stripe down the middle of the back. A light stripe on each side may be yellow, green, or blue. The area between the light stripes usually has an alternating double row of black spots. This photo was taken in Lakewood, Colorado.

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Photo of a plains gartersnake taken in Lakewood, Colorado.

Plains Gartersnake (Plains Garter Snake)

Thamnophis radix
An attractive, medium-sized snake of wet meadows and marshes, the plains gartersnake spends warm summer days basking in the sun or searching for food. Winters are spent underground, probably in abandoned rodent tunnels.

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Image of a plains hog-nosed snake

Plains Hog-Nosed Snake

Heterodon nasicus nasicus
The plains hog-nosed snake differs from the eastern hog-nosed snake by having a sharply upturned snout and black pigment on the underside of the tail. This species has always been rare in Missouri and has probably been extirpated.

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11-2010 Timber Rattlesnake

Plants and Animals

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Missouri’s largest venomous snake has the camouflage and demeanor to keep it under the radar.

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prairie kingsnake

Prairie Kingsnake (Prairie King Snake)

Lampropeltis calligaster calligaster
The prairie kingsnake is fairly common over most of the state. The overall color is tan, brownish-gray, or greenish-gray. Numerous dark blotches down the back and sides are brown, reddish, or greenish brown. It lives in prairies and open woods and on rocky, wooded hillsides.

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Image of a prairie ring-necked snake

Prairie Ring-Necked Snake

Diadophis punctatus arnyi
Prairie ring-necked snakes are easily recognizable by their small size, uniform dark color on the back, bright yellow-orange belly, and distinct yellow ring around the neck.

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