Search

Content tagged with "snake"

northern rough greensnake

Northern Rough Greensnake (Northern Rough Green Snake)

Opheodrys aestivus aestivus
This long, slender snake is common in the Ozarks. It is light green above with a white or yellowish belly, and the scales on the back have small ridges or keels that feel rough to the touch. Its beautiful green color helps this mild-mannered insectivore blend in with the trees that are its home.

Read more

Photo of a northern scarletsnake on a rock surface in Georgia.

Northern Scarletsnake

One of Missouri's most brilliantly colored snakes is extremely rare to find. The northern scarletsnake is similar in pattern and color to the more common red milksnake but has a red or orange snout and a spotless, white belly. This photo was taken in Tifton, Georgia.

Read more

Photo of a northern scarletsnake on a rock surface in Georgia.

Northern Scarletsnake (Northern Scarlet Snake)

Cemophora coccinea copei
One of Missouri's most brilliantly colored snakes is extremely rare to find. The northern scarletsnake is similar in pattern and color to the more common red milksnake but has a red or orange snout and a spotless, white belly.

Read more

Photo of a northern watersnake in shallow water.

Northern Watersnake

The northern watersnake is gray to reddish brown with dark brown crossbands. The belly is cream-colored with black and reddish half-moon markings.

Read more

Photo of a northern watersnake rearing back on a dry gravel surface.

Northern Watersnake

Unlike cottonmouths, with which they are often confused, northern watersnakes (and all other nonvenomous snakes in Missouri) have round, not vertical, pupils. Many other characteristics separate the venomous from the nonvenomous species. Cottonmouths, for example, are not known to occur north of the Missouri River in our state.

Read more

Photo of a northern watersnake among fishes in shallow water.

Northern Watersnake

Watersnakes were formerly killed under the mistaken belief that they ate game fish. In reality, they improve fishing by eating dead or dying fish (preventing the spread of fish diseases), by reducing fish overpopulation, and by providing food for game species (large game fish eat young watersnakes).

Read more

Photo of a northern watersnake rearing back in grass on land.

Northern Watersnake

The northern watersnake is Missouri's most common watersnake. Like other watersnakes, it is often confused with the venomous western cottonmouth and needlessly killed.

Read more

Photo of a northern watersnake, closeup on head.

Northern Watersnake

Like other watersnakes, the northern watersnake can defend itself by biting viciously and secreting a strong-smelling musk from glands at the base of the tail. Watersnakes are not venomous, however.

Read more

Photo of a northern watersnake rearing back in grass on land.

Northern Watersnake (Northern Water Snake)

Nerodia sipedon sipedon
The northern watersnake is gray to reddish brown with dark brown crossbands. The belly is cream-colored with black and reddish half-moon markings. This is Missouri’s most common watersnake.

Read more

Orange-Striped Ribbonsnake (Western Ribbon Snake)

Thamnophis proximus proximus
Our subspecies of western ribbonsnake is named for the attractive orange (or yellowish) stripes running the length of its body. A member of the gartersnake group, this species is found statewide, but seldom far from water.

Read more