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Content tagged with "snake"

Photo of a northern red-bellied snake viewed from above.

Northern Red-Bellied Snake

Storeria occipitomaculata occipitomaculata
The northern red-bellied snake is of our smallest snakes. It is generally gray brown or reddish brown on top, bright red or orange below. This harmless species is sometimes mistaken for a young copperhead and needlessly killed.

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northern rough greensnake

Northern Rough Greensnake

The northern rough greensnake is a long and slender snake often seen in the Ozarks. It is light green above and has a white or yellowish belly. Scales on the back have small ridges or keels, making it feel rough to the touch. Unlike the similar smooth greensnake (O. vernalis), it is fairly common in Missouri.

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northern rough greensnake

Northern Rough Greensnake (Northern Rough Green Snake)

Opheodrys aestivus aestivus
This long, slender snake is common in the Ozarks. It is light green above with a white or yellowish belly, and the scales on the back have small ridges or keels that feel rough to the touch. Its beautiful green color helps this mild-mannered insectivore blend in with the trees that are its home.

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Northern Scarletsnake (Northern Scarlet Snake)

Cemophora coccinea copei
One of Missouri's most brilliantly colored snakes is extremely rare to find. It is similar in pattern and color to the more common red milksnake but has a red or orange snout and a spotless, white belly.

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Image of a northern watersnake

Northern Watersnake (Northern Water Snake)

Nerodia sipedon sipedon
The northern watersnake is gray to reddish brown with dark brown crossbands. The belly is cream-colored with black and reddish half-moon markings. This is Missouri’s most common watersnake.

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Orange-Striped Ribbonsnake (Western Ribbon Snake)

Thamnophis proximus proximus
Our subspecies of western ribbonsnake is named for the attractive orange (or yellowish) stripes running the length of its body. A member of the gartersnake group, this species is found statewide, but seldom far from water.

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Image of an osage copperhead

Osage Copperhead

Agkistrodon contortrix phaeogaster
Copperheads are pit vipers, with an opening on each side of the head and (in daylight) eyes with catlike, vertical pupils (our nonvenomous snakes have round pupils).

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Osage Copperhead

Video of an Osage copperhead in the wild.

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Plains Gartersnake (Plains Garter Snake)

Thamnophis radix
An attractive, medium-sized snake of wet meadows and marshes, the plains gartersnake spends warm summer days basking in the sun or searching for food. Winters are spent underground, probably in abandoned rodent tunnels.

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