Search

Content tagged with "snake"

Photo of an orangish eastern hog-nosed snake playing dead.

Eastern Hog-Nosed Snake

If hissing, spreading its head, and pretending to strike fails to ward off an enemy, an eastern hog-nosed snake may play dead: Go into convulsions, open its mouth, let the tongue hang out, writhe about and roll over on its back, and release feces from its cloaca.

Read more

Manage your Missouri land to help this endangered species.

Read more

Photo of an eastern yellow-bellied racer.

Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer

Coluber constrictor flaviventris
The color of eastern yellow-bellied racers is uniform but varies from olive, tan, brown, or blue to nearly black. The belly may be yellow, cream, or light blue gray. This nonvenomous snake occurs nearly statewide.

Read more

Photo of an eastern yellow-bellied racer, closeup of head.

Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer

The eastern yellow-bellied racer subspecies occurs nearly statewide. They are active March through November. Active during daytime, they live in native prairies, grasslands, pastures, brushy areas, and along the edges of forests.

Read more

Photo of an eastern yellow-bellied racer.

Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer

The color of an eastern yellow-bellied racer is uniform but can range from olive, tan, brown, or blue to nearly black. The belly may be yellow, cream, or light blue gray. This nonvenomous snake occurs nearly statewide.

Read more

Photo of an eastern yellow-bellied racer.

Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer

Many Missourians know yellow-bellied racers as “blue racers,” and indeed, some individuals are blue, bluish black, bluish gray. Herpetologists create common names for species and subspecies that correspond precisely with scientific names, so “eastern yellow-bellied racer” is a more exact name.

Read more

Photo of an eastern yellow-bellied racer, closeup of head.

Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer

As the name implies, racers can move fast, especially through tall grass or brush. When alarmed, racers try to escape quickly and sometimes vibrate their tails. When captured, they struggle violently, bite viciously, and discharge musk and waste matter from their vents.

Read more

Photo of an eastern yellow-bellied racer hunting.

Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer

The food of yellow-bellied racers includes frogs, lizards, small snakes, small rodents, birds, and insects. Despite their Latin species name, racers are not constrictors. They use their speed and agility to overtake prey — as well as to escape their own predators.

Read more

Photo of an eastern yellow-bellied racer in vines on the ground.

Eastern Yellow-Bellied Racer

Courtship and mating occur soon after yellow-bellied racers emerge from overwintering retreats, usually in early April. Egg-laying is in mid-June to late July. The female lays 8-21 eggs under logs, in rotten stumps, or in abandoned mammal burrows. The eggs hatch in 2-3 months.

Read more

Endangered Reptile and Amphibian Management Sheets

Browse and download best practices for managing your Missouri property for several kinds of endangered reptiles and amphibians, including Blanding's turtle, eastern massasauga rattlesnake, hellbenders, Illinois chorus frog, Illinois mud turtle, western chicken turtle, and western fox snake.

Read more