Search

Content tagged with "smartweed"

Photo of climbing false buckwheat plants mounded along a roadside.

Climbing False Buckwheat

Climbing false buckwheat is a rampant annual or perennial climber that often forms curtainlike masses of twining red stems, covering shrubs and trees. Look for it in moist, open or shaded bottomlands, alluvial valleys, and floodplains.

Read more

Photo of climbing false buckwheat vines, leaves, and flowers.

Climbing False Buckwheat

Climbing false buckwheat is related to smartweeds, buckwheat, knotweeds, and rhubarb. A vigorous nonwoody vine, it is common in low, moist areas. This patch was photographed along the Katy Trail just north of Jefferson City.

Read more

Photo of climbing false buckwheat mass with flowers.

Climbing False Buckwheat

The flower and fruit clusters of climbing false buckwheat are rather showy, considering it is a rampant vine. This native plant provides shelter and food for wildlife, and it contributes to stabilizing bottomland soils that are prone to flooding.

Read more

Photo of climbing false buckwheat vines, leaves, and flowers.

Climbing False Buckwheat (Crested Buckwheat)

Fallopia scandens (formerly Polygonum scandens)
Climbing false buckwheat is a rampant annual or perennial climber that often forms curtainlike masses of twining red stems, covering shrubs and trees. Look for it in moist, open or shaded bottomlands, alluvial valleys, and floodplains.

Read more

Photo of climbing false buckwheat leaves and stems.

Climbing False Buckwheat (Crested Buckwheat) Foliage

Climbing false buckwheat drapes its masses of twining red stems and ovate to heart-shaped leaves over trees and shrubs. The stems can be more than 16 feet long, but in masses like this you would have a hard time isolating one to measure its length! It is common statewide in open, disturbed areas.

Read more

Photo of climbing false buckwheat closeup showing tiny flowers.

Climbing False Buckwheat (Flowers)

The flowers of climbing false buckwheat are minute, greenish white, and borne at the top of the cluster, while older flowers mature into fruits below. The 3 persistent, winged outer segments of the calyx contribute much to the overall floral cluster, especially as they mature and get larger.

Read more

Photo of climbing false buckwheat, closeup of calyces and fruits.

Climbing False Buckwheat (Fruits)

The fruits of climbing false buckwheat are enclosed in the enlarged remains of the calyx, whose outer 3 segments are strongly winged. The seeds are shiny, smooth, and dark brown to black. They look and taste like buckwheat.

Read more

Photo of Japanese knotweed

Japanese Knotweed

Fallopia japonica
One of the worst invasive species in the world, this plant can thrive in many places and can even damage foundations of buildings—not to mention the harm it causes in natural habitats. Learn to “know thine enemy,” so you can prevent its spread.

Read more

Photo of Japanese knotweed

Japanese Knotweed

One of the worst invasive species in the world, Japanese knotweed can thrive in many places and can even damage foundations of buildings—not to mention the harm it causes in natural habitats. Learn to identify it so you can prevent its spread.

Read more

Photo of water smartweed plant and flower cluster

Water Smartweed

Water smartweed can live submerged in water, or on wet banks or other soggy ground, yet it can also live in merely moist areas. The stems often sprawl as they grow, taking root at the swollen nodes. The small, pink flowers develop in long, erect clusters.

Read more