Content tagged with "shrub"

After the Blizzard of 2011, Can You STILL Find the Quail in this Picture?

photo of two quail in snowy woods
Even after last week’s snowstorm, the quail are still alive and still under the shrub thickets shown in the photo from last week’s post. More
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Alternate-Leaved Dogwood (Pagoda Dogwood)

Cornus alternifolia
Dogwoods have leaves arranged opposite one another on the stem—except for this species! This shrub or small tree is a popular ornamental, especially in the northern parts of Missouri, where it can be too cold to grow flowering dogwood. More

American Hazelnut

american hazelnut
Corylus americana
American hazelnut, also called hazel or American filbert, grows in dense thickets on a wide variety of soils and sites. The nuts are prized by humans and by squirrels! More

American Holly

american holly
Ilex opaca
This is Missouri's most durable broad-leafed evergreen tree and is best known for its bright red berries and spiny green leaves at Christmas. More

American Hornbeam (Musclewood)

Image of an american hornbeam bark
Carpinus caroliniana
American hornbeam is also called musclewood because of the sinewy appearance of its smooth gray bark. The name hornbeam refers to the genuine strength of its wood—it is one of the hardest and strongest woods in North America. More

Arrowwood Viburnum (Southern Arrow Wood)

arrowwood viburnum
Viburnum dentatum
This lovely shrub is critically imperiled in Missouri, but the white flower clusters and dark blue berries make it a great choice for landscaping. More

Autumn Olive

Invasive autumn olive in fruit
Elaeagnus umbellata
This shrub can be found all over the state, since it was planted widely with the best of intentions. Despite its “pros,” this species has proven to be very invasive. It threatens native ecosystems and should not be planted. More

Autumn Olive (Fruit)

Autumn Olive, fruit
Fruits ripen from pink to red, with speckles. They are finely dotted with pale scales and are produced in abundance each year. More

Autumn Olive (Underside of Leaf)

Autumn olive, underside of leaf
The lower surface is covered with silvery white scales, a conspicuous characteristic that can be seen from a distance. More

Black Haw

image of black haw
Viburnum prunifolium
This small understory tree has beautiful fall color: deep lavender or maroon-purple, finally becoming deep rose-red, contrasting with clusters of blue-black berries, borne on red stalks, that happen to be quite tasty. No wonder it has been cultivated as an ornamental since 1727! More