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Content tagged with "salamander"

Photo of a dark-sided salamander on a rock.

Dark-Sided Salamander

Compared to the long-tailed salamander, the dark-sided salamander subspecies (Eurycea longicauda melanopleura) has large amounts of dark pigment along the sides, from the head onto the tail, and has larger and more numerous dark spots on the back. This subspecies occurs throughout most of southern and eastern Missouri.

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Eastern Tiger Salamander

Ambystoma tigrinum
Tiger salamanders belong to the “mole salamander” family, named because they spend most of their time underground, often in burrows made by small mammals or under logs and rocks. Your best chance of seeing tiger salamander is at night after a heavy rain.

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Photo of a netful of bowfin fingerlings

Flood Pulse: Wetland Health Check-Up

I’ve discussed before that one of our Duck Creek renovation goals is to reconnect historic drainages when possible. During flood events several spillways and low water crossings will help facilitate this. Well, in the last month Mother Nature reconnected the whole basin, spillways or not, during this historic flood event. Over the last two weeks we’ve gone out and have taken a look to see what kind of critters are out and about and utilizing these connected habitats.

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Photo of a four-toed salamander on a mossy rock.

Four-Toed Salamander

A glacial relict in Missouri’s eastern Ozarks, the four-toed salamander lives among mosses in heavily forested streams and creeks and sinkhole ponds. In the northern part of its range, this salamander lives in peat bogs.

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Photo of a four-toed salamander on a mossy rock.

Four-Toed Salamander

Hemidactylium scutatum
A glacial relict in Missouri’s eastern Ozarks, the four-toed salamander lives among mosses in heavily forested streams and creeks and sinkhole ponds. In the northern part of its range, this salamander lives in peat bogs.

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Grotto Salamander

Video of a grotto salamander.

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Image of a grotto salamander

Grotto Salamander

Eurycea spelaea
Many people know Missouri as “the cave state,” and the grotto salamander is Missouri’s only species of blind salamander. A true troglobite, it lives in total darkness and has small eyes that are completely or partially covered by their pink or beige skin.

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hellbender, a large brown salamander resting in gravelly streambed

Hellbender

Cryptobranchus alleganiensis
You might think they’re ugly by human standards, but these giant amphibians are a unique part of our wildlife heritage; they direly need help, or they might become extinct within twenty years.

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Manage your Ozark streams to help this endangered species.

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Photo of a long-tailed salamander on a rotten log.

Long-Tailed Salamander

The long-tailed salamander is agile and can escape predators by using its tail for quick jumps. This species occurs in southeastern Missouri but not in the Mississippi Lowlands of the Bootheel.

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