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Content tagged with "salamander"

Photo of a dark-sided salamander on a rock.

Dark-Sided Salamander

Compared to the long-tailed salamander, the dark-sided salamander subspecies (Eurycea longicauda melanopleura) has large amounts of dark pigment along the sides, from the head onto the tail, and has larger and more numerous dark spots on the back. This subspecies occurs throughout most of southern and eastern Missouri.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander on dry oak leaves.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

Eastern tiger salamander populations are declining overall when compared to historical levels. They need fishless water holes, ponds, and swamps to survive, and you can help them by developing and maintaining these features on your property.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander’s head.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

Days are spent in burrows or under logs, as tiger salamanders are active only at night. Your best chance of seeing a tiger salamander is at night after a heavy rain.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander with yellow spots.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

Ambystoma tigrinum
Tiger salamanders belong to the mole salamander family, named because they spend most of their time underground, often in burrows made by small mammals or under logs and rocks. Your best chance of seeing a tiger salamander is at night after a heavy rain.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander with yellow spots.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

The eastern tiger salamander is a dark, medium to large salamander with yellow or olive blotches over the head, body, and tail.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander with irregular blotches.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

The yellow or olive blotches on an adult eastern tiger salamander vary greatly in size and shape.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander showing front half of body.

Eastern Tiger Salamander

Eastern tiger salamanders live in a wide variety of habitats including woodlands, swamps, prairies, and old fields (near farm ponds) and may sometimes be found in wells, basements, and root cellars. They spend most of their time in burrows or under logs.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander larva.

Eastern Tiger Salamander Larva

Like the young of most other salamanders, the larvae of tiger salamanders are aquatic and have feathery-looking external (exposed) gills.

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Photo of an eastern tiger salamander larva.

Eastern Tiger Salamander Larva

The larvae of tiger salamanders are sometimes erroneously called waterdogs. This is confusing, because “waterdog” is a common name for mudpuppies, which are in a different family of salamanders.

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Photo of a netful of bowfin fingerlings

Flood Pulse: Wetland Health Check-Up

I’ve discussed before that one of our Duck Creek renovation goals is to reconnect historic drainages when possible. During flood events several spillways and low water crossings will help facilitate this. Well, in the last month Mother Nature reconnected the whole basin, spillways or not, during this historic flood event. Over the last two weeks we’ve gone out and have taken a look to see what kind of critters are out and about and utilizing these connected habitats.

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