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Content tagged with "salamander"

A Salamander Went a Courtin'

Did you know that as you sleep this month, there may be a tiger mating in a nearby pond or marsh?

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Amphibians and Reptiles

You know them as frogs, toads, snakes, turtles and lizards. Get acquainted with all of Missouri's fascinating herptiles, including 43 amphibians and 75 species and subspecies of reptiles.

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Image of a cave salamander

Cave Salamander

Eurycea lucifuga
This common amphibian of the Ozark Plateau lives in caves, springs and rocky streams. Recognize it by its normally bright orange skin dotted with dark brown or black spots.

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Photo of a central newt adult on a plastic aquarium plant.

Central Newt

Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis
A small, olive-brown salamander with a fascinating life cycle, the central newt lives in and around woodland ponds and swamps in all but our far northwestern counties.

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Photo of a central newt adult suspended in water.

Central Newt (Adult)

The adult central newt lacks gills and costal grooves (vertical grooves along the sides). The back is olive brown. Numerous small black spots usually cover the body. A dark line runs from the nostril through the eye to the forelimbs.

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Photo of a central newt adult on a plastic aquarium plant.

Central Newt (Adult)

A small, olive-brown salamander with a fascinating life cycle, the central newt lives in and around woodland ponds and swamps in all but our far northwestern counties.

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Photo of a central newt eft on a leaf.

Central Newt (Eft)

During their terrestrial “eft” stage, central newts take shelter under logs, rocks, or piles of dead leaves in wooded areas and may travel far from the ponds they hatched in.

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Photo of a central newt eft sticking out its tongue.

Central Newt (Eft)

During their terrestrial “eft” stage, central newts eat small insects and tiny snails they find under logs and rocks.

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Photo of a central newt eft on a white background.

Central Newt (Eft)

Central newts have a complex life cycle. Upon hatching from eggs laid on aquatic plants, they live their first few months as aquatic larvae with feathery external gills. In late July or early August, they transform into land-dwelling efts. After living 2–3 years on land, they return to a pond or swamp, change into aquatic adults, and spend the rest of their lives mostly in water.

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Photo of a central newt eft showing bumpy skin.

Central Newt (Eft)

Central newts live on land in the middle, or “eft” stage of their life cycle. Efts are dull brown to reddish brown, with a rounded (not flattened) tail and rough skin.

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