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Content tagged with "rose"

Photo of goat's beard plant with flower clusters

Goat’s Beard

Aruncus dioicus
Goat’s beard is named for its bold, branching, plumelike clusters of flowers. Look for it growing in rich soils in low woods and north-facing slopes, bases of bluffs, and other moist places in the southeastern half of our state.

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Photo of goat's beard plant with flower clusters

Goat’s Beard

Goat’s beard is named for its bold, branching, plumelike clusters of flowers. Look for it growing in rich soils in low woods and north-facing slopes, bases of bluffs, and other moist places in the southeastern half of our state.

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Multiflora Rose

Rosa multiflora
Starting more than a century ago, this nonnative rose was planted across America — for many good reasons — but it has proven to be invasive, and now the goal is to stop its spread.

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Multiflora Rose Control

Learn to identify and control this invasive plant on your Missouri property.

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Photo of prairie rose blossom closeup showing pink petals and man yellow stamens

Prairie Rose (Climbing Rose)

Rosa setigera
“Climbing rose” is the better of the two common names for this native shrub or woody vine: It is most common near woodlands, where it climbs and trails on neighboring shrubs and small trees.

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Photo of prairie rose blossom closeup showing pink petals and man yellow stamens

Prairie Rose (Climbing Rose)

“Climbing rose” is the better of the two common names for this native shrub or woody vine: It is most common near woodlands, where it climbs and trails on neighboring shrubs and small trees.

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