Content tagged with "rodent"

Muskrat

Photograph of a muskrat standing on grass
Ondatra zibethicus
One of the most abundant commercial furbearers in Missouri, this semiaquatic rodent has benefited from the construction of thousands of farm ponds throughout the state. More

Muskrat Dens

Photograph of several muskrat dens in a wetlands in twilight
Muskrats often build large houses out of vegetation in shallow water. The nest, or den, is reached by means of a tunnel that usually opens under water. Other times, they dig their homes into a stream or pond bank. More

Muskrat on Dry Land

Photograph of a muskrat standing on grass
Muskrats are semiaquatic, living in marshes, sloughs, streams, rivers, ponds, and lakes. More

Muskrat Swimming

Photograph of a muskrat swimming
One of the most abundant commercial furbearers in Missouri, this semiaquatic rodent has benefited from the construction of thousands of farm ponds throughout the state. More

Nutria (Coypu)

Nutria in wetland habitat
Myocastor coypus
Native to South America, this large aquatic rodent was brought to the U.S. and other countries for the fur market. In Missouri, the nutria has been occasionally trapped in the southeastern part of the state. More

Prairie Vole Surface Runways

Drawing of prairie vole surface runways with tunnel entrance hole
Voles build a system of well-defined runways both on top of the ground and underground. Holes about 2 inches wide lead from the surface runways to the underground tunnels. The floor of the runway is often littered with grass clippings and “paved” with soil excavated from the tunnels. More

Prairie Voles

Photo of two prairie voles in a nest made of dried grasses
Prairie voles (M. ochrogaster) are found statewide. Like other voles, their populations have cycles of abundance and decline, peaking about once every four years. They are an important food for many predators, and their varying numbers can cause peaks and declines in their predators' populations. More

Voles (Meadow Mice)

Photo of two prairie voles in a nest made of dried grasses
Microtus ochrogaster, M. pinetorum, and M. pennsylvanicus
There are three species of voles in Missouri: prairie, meadow, and woodland voles. These mouselike rodents have rounded, blunt snouts, chisel-shaped front teeth, and short tails. More