Content tagged with "pine"

Austrian Pine

austrian pine
Pinus nigra
Primarily a landscaping tree, Austrian pine sometimes reproduces here on its own, and for this reason it's officially included in the flora of our state. Usually, you find it in urban and suburban ornamental plantings or, if you're out hiking, persisting at old home sites. More

Eastern White Pine

eastern white pine
Pinus strobus
It is unlikely you will find an eastern white pine on a hike, unless you come across an old homesite where somebody planted it, or the trees that were its parents. A native to much of eastern North America, it has been widely introduced in Missouri and sometimes reproduces on its own. More

European Wood Wasp (Emerging Female)

Photo of European wood wasp female emerging from wood
This invasive insect lives for about a year as a grublike larva inside the trunks of trees, then pupates, transforming into an adult. In our area, new adults would probably emerge from tree trunks July through September. More

European Wood Wasp (Sirex Woodwasp)

Photo of male and female European wood wasps on pine stump
European wood wasp, female (left) and male (right). This species is known to cause the death of up to 80 percent of the pine trees in an area, and it could soon arrive in Missouri. Help protect our pines by learning how to identify this troublesome insect. More

European Wood Wasp (Sirex Woodwasp)

Photo of male and female European wood wasps on pine stump
Sirex noctilio
The European wood wasp, or sirex woodwasp, is known to cause the death of up to 80 percent of the pine trees in an area, and it could soon arrive in Missouri. Help protect our pines by learning how to identify this troublesome insect. More

European Wood Wasp Control

Photo of European wood wasp female emerging from wood
Learn to identify and control this destructive forest pest, which attacks Missouri's pine trees. More

European Wood Wasp Larva

Photo of European wood wasp larva in gallery in pine wood
The larvae of European wood wasps are creamy white, legless, with a dark spine at the hind end, and thus look very much like the larvae of our native horntail species. They have a symbiotic fungus that causes the tree tissues to deteriorate; the larvae feed on the fungus as they tunnel through the wood. Unfortunately, this process kills the tree entirely. More

Fall Color at Hawn State Park

Fall color at Hawn State Park
Photo of fall color at Hawn State Park. More

Houf Pine Forest

photo of Houf Pine Forest
Shortleaf pine forest. More

Jack Pine

jack pine
Pinus banksiana
Native to the northeastern United States and Canada, jack pine has been introduced in many other places, including Missouri. This scrubby tree is planted as an ornamental, for windbreaks or for erosion control. It reproduces locally in and around places where it has been planted. More