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Content tagged with "parasite"

Invasion Of The Body Snatchers

This content is archived
They're creepy and crawly, and they catch fish long before you do.

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small catfish with lamprey attached to its side and back

Lamprey Attached to Slender Madtom

This little madtom is the unfortunate host of the parasitic chestnut lamprey, which is attached by its suction-disk mouth. After sucking the madtom's blood and other bodily fluids for up to several days, the lamprey will drop off. Host fish usually don't die from lamprey attacks but may succumb to secondary infections of their wounds.

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Photograph of several mosquito larvae resting at water surface

Mosquito Larvae ("Wrigglers")

Mosquito larvae are aquatic, with a large head and thorax and narrow, wormlike abdomen. They typically hang just below the water surface, breathing air through tubes at the end of the abdomen. When disturbed, they wriggle downward.

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image of Mosquito

Mosquitoes

There are about 50 species of mosquitoes in our state.
Who likes mosquitoes? Certainly not people! However, mosquitoes have lived on Earth for millions of years, and all that time they’ve been feeding fish with their legions of “wriggler” larvae.

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Tapeworms

Tapeworm cysts in deer are harmless to humans but indicate the parasite is present in the region, and human infection by other means may be possible. Learn more.

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Image of a tick.

Tick

Tick.

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Image of a tick.

Ticks

Three species are most commonly encountered in Missouri.
Some of the most problematic animals in Missouri, ticks drink the blood of humans and other mammals. The idea of blood-sucking parasites is hideous enough, but ticks are known carriers of serious, sometimes deadly diseases. Learn more about these large mites and how to protect yourself from their bites.

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