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Content tagged with "orchid"

Photo of a western prairie fringed orchid plant with flowers

Western Prairie Fringed Orchid

Platanthera praeclara
Western prairie fringed orchid is endangered and known only from a few northwestern locations in our state. Learn about this showy native wildflower of Missouri’s western prairies, and why it’s so important to preserve our remaining tallgrass prairies.

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Photo of a western prairie fringed orchid plant with flowers

Western Prairie Fringed Orchid

Western prairie fringed orchid is endangered and known only from a few northwestern locations in our state. Learn about this showy native wildflower of Missouri’s western prairies, and why it’s so important to preserve our remaining tallgrass prairies.

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Photo of two small yellow lady’s slipper flowers

Yellow Lady’s Slipper

Cypripedium calceolus
Yellow lady’s slipper is found statewide. It is among our showiest native orchids, and suffers from its popularity. Although orchids rarely survive transplanting, people try digging them up anyway.

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Photo of yellow lady's slipper orchid closeup side view of flower

Yellow Lady’s Slipper

Yellow lady’s slipper flowers have three long, twisted “flags”—the upright one being a sepal, the other two, on either side of the “slipper,” being two lateral petals. The bright yellow slipper, or lip, is a third, modified petal. The petal-like structure behind the lip is actually a pair of fused sepals. Thus there are 3 sepals and 3 petals.

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Photo of yellow lady’s slipper stalk with leaves

Yellow Lady’s Slipper (Leaves)

The leaves of yellow lady’s slipper are broad, hairy, sharply pointed, prominently parallel-veined, and clasp the stem; they grow to 6 inches long. The number of leaves per stalk is one way to determining which subspecies a plant is.

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