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Content tagged with "orchid"

Photo of Adam and Eve orchid leaf

Adam and Eve Orchid (Leaf)

Adam and Eve orchids have leaves from September all the way through winter. There's a good chance you've noticed this orchid on your winter hikes and wondered about its strange appearance: a green-and-white-striped, pleated leaf lying flat upon the dead leaves on the forest floor. Check back in May to see its flowers!

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Photo of Adam and Eve orchid flowers

Adam and Eve Orchid (Putty Root)

Aplectrum hyemale
There's a good chance you've noticed this orchid on your winter hikes and wondered about its strange appearance: a green-and-white-striped, pleated leaf lying flat upon the dead leaves on the forest floor. Check back in May to see its flowers!

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Photo of Adam and Eve orchid flowers

Adam and Eve Orchid (Putty Root) (Flowers)

Flowers arise on a bare stem and are light to dark brown and about ½ inch long. They are sometimes slightly purple toward the base of the 3 sepals and petals. The lip is small, white, with 3 lobes and magenta markings. The leaves of this orchid wither away by flowering time in May and June.

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Photo of common ladies' tresses, flower stalk with spiral flower arrangement

Common Ladies’ Tresses (Nodding Ladies’ Tresses)

Of the seven species of ladies' tresses in Missouri, this is the most common. The flowers are arranged in a spiral pattern on the upright flowering stem. Each small flower is a little white orchid.

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Photo of common ladies' tresses, flower stalk with spiral flower arrangement

Common Ladies’ Tresses (Nodding Ladies’ Tresses)

Spiranthes cernua
Of the seven species of ladies' tresses in Missouri, this is the most common. The flowers are arranged in a spiral pattern on the upright flowering stem. Each small flower is a little white orchid.

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Photo of large yellow lady’s slipper

Large Yellow Lady’s Slipper

We have two subspecies of yellow lady’s slipper in our state. Large yellow lady’s slipper (var. pubescens) has a lip 1-2¼ inches long, flags yellowish green with purplish streaks, and 3-4 leaves per stem. It is the larger variety, growing to 2 feet high, and it grows in eastern Missouri.

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Photo of large yellow lady’s slipper closeup of flower

Large Yellow Lady’s Slipper

Yellow lady’s slipper is found statewide. It is among our showiest native orchids, and suffers from its popularity. Although orchids rarely survive transplanting, people try digging them up anyway.

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Missouri Orchid

Orchids: A View of Our Tropical Missouri

This content is archived
Areas of rugged terrain, calcareous soils and secret fens provide habitat for rare species.

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Photo of small yellow lady’s slipper plants with flowers

Small Yellow Lady’s Slipper

Most orchids are declining, and there are a number of causes. Collecting orchids for gardening is the saddest reason for their decline, since it’s no secret that lady’s slippers nearly always die upon transplanting. Here’s another reason to let them be: Touching lady’s slippers can cause a skin rash in some people.

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Photo of two small yellow lady’s slipper flowers

Small Yellow Lady’s Slipper

We have two subspecies of yellow lady’s slipper in our state. Small yellow lady’s slipper (var. parviflorum) has a lip ¾-1 inch long, flags reddish purple to brown, and 4-6 leaves per stem. It is the smaller variety, and it grows in western and southern counties.

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