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Content tagged with "orb weaver"

Photo of an arboreal orb weaver spider

Arboreal Orb Weaver

There are several species of Neoscona and Araneus orb weavers in Missouri, and some of these spiders are difficult to distinguish. They tend to have camouflage patterns, and all make the characteristic, delicate, wheel-shaped "orb" webs as nets for catching prey.

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Photo of an arboreal orb weaver spider

Arboreal Orb Weavers

Neoscona spp. and Araneus spp.
There are several species of Neoscona and Araneus orb weavers in Missouri, and some of these spiders are difficult to distinguish. They tend to have camouflage patterns, and all make the characteristic, delicate, wheel-shaped "orb" webs as nets for catching prey.

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Photo of a barn spider, or spotted orbweaver, hiding in a corner

Barn Spider (Spotted Orb Weaver)

This “barn spider” is probably Neoscona crucifera, also called Hentz’s orbweaver and spotted orb weaver. It’s a widespread species that commonly builds its webs in woods and on the eaves of barns and other structures (including houses). The female takes down her web each morning, hides in cracks and corners during the day (as shown in this picture), and spins a new large, round web at dusk. This individual built her web next to a dusk-to-dawn porch light each night for several weeks one late summer, taking advantage of the host of flying insects attracted to the light.

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Photo of a marbled orb weaver spider

Marbled Orb Weaver

The marbled orb weaver (Araneus marmoreus) is a colorful spider whose wide range includes all of the eastern United States. It’s sometimes called “pumpkin spider” because the rounded abdomen of this species is sometimes bright orange. The pattern is variable, and the color can be white, yellow, or orange, with mottling and spotting of black, brown, or purple. Females build their wheel-shaped webs among trees and tall weeds in moist woods, often near streams.

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orchard orb weaver

Orchard Orb Weaver

Leucauge venusta
These colorful, delicate spiders make circular webs that are usually positioned horizontally or at an angle to the ground, and they typically hang in the middle of their webs.

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Image of female spiny-bellied orb weaver on a leaf

Spiny-Bellied Orb Weaver

Micrathena gracilis
The color pattern can vary, but the ten-spined, chunky abdomen sets the female spiny-bellied orb weaver apart from all other spiders.

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Photo of a spiny-bellied orb weaver on a twig

Spiny-Bellied Orb Weaver

There can be great variation in the color pattern, but the ten-spined, chunky abdomen sets the female spiny-bellied orb weaver (Micrathena gracilis) apart from all other spiders.

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Image of female spiny-bellied orb weaver on a leaf

Spiny-Bellied Orb Weaver (Micrathena gracilis)

M. gracilis, the spiny-bellied orb weaver, or spined micrathena, has 5 pairs of black tubercles and a white and black (or yellowish and brown-black) mottled abdomen. Orb weavers, including this one, spin wheel-shaped webs that are usually positioned vertically. This species tends to hang with its "back" toward the ground and the spinnerets pointing upward, with the abdomen looking like a tiny pyramid.

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