Content tagged with "nuisance plant"

Sericea Lespedeza

Photo of large group of sericea lespedeza plants
Decades ago, sericea lespedeza was introduced in hopes it would provide hay, improve pastures, stop soil erosion, and supply food and cover for wildlife. Unfortunately, it has proven to be an aggressive, invasive weed that is extremely difficult to control, escapes cultivation, and outcompetes native plants. More

Sericea Lespedeza Invasive Species Fact Sheet

Use this print-and-carry sheet to identify and control invasive sericea lespedeza on your Missouri property. More

Sesbania Control

Browse methods for controlling nuisance sesbania in Missouri. More

Smooth Sumac

photo of a Smooth Sumac seed head
Rhus glabra
This colony-forming shrub is most noticeable in early autumn, because it is one of the first plants to turn color—and boy, can it turn a brilliant red! If you're into wild edibles, you'll want to learn to identify smooth sumac, so you can make drinks and jellies from the clusters of fuzzy red berries. More

Smooth Sumac Control

photo of a Smooth Sumac seed head
Browse methods for controlling smooth sumac in Missouri. More

Spotted Knapweed Invasive Species Fact Sheet

Use this print-and-carry sheet to identify and control noxious spotted knapweed on your Missouri property. More

Submerged Plant Control

This Aquaguide shows you how to control submerged plants such as coontail, elodea, and naiad in your Missouri pond. More

Tall Fescue

Photo of tall fescue plants
Festuca arundinacea
You’ve seen it a million times, now learn to identify it! Technically an exotic invasive plant, tall fescue is practically everywhere, from lawns to levees, and from pastures to (unfortunately!) prairies. More

Tall Fescue (Flowers)

Photo of tall fescue flowers
Tall fescue’s branching flowering stalks are somewhat narrow and contracted to slightly spreading, usually 2-10 inches long, and often nodding at the top. Flowers occur in flat, oval spikelets that are 1/4 to 1/2 inch long. There are usually 4-5 individual flowers in each spikelet. It blooms April through July (sometimes to October). More

Tall Fescue (Plants)

Photo of tall fescue plants
You’ve seen it a million times! Technically an exotic invasive plant, tall fescue is practically everywhere, from lawns to levees, and from pastures to (unfortunately!) prairies. More