Content tagged with "nuisance plant"

Nuisance Native Plants

Sometimes our native plants, such as poison ivy and sumac, can become nuisances. Learn to control them here. More

Old World Bluestems Invasive Species Fact Sheet

Use this print-and-carry sheet to identify and control invasive Old World bluestem grasses on your Missouri property. More

Osage Orange Control

Image of an osage orange leaf
Browse methods for controlling nuisance osage orange in Missouri. More

Poison Ivy Control

Image of poison ivy
Browse methods for controlling poison ivy in Missouri. More

Purple Loosestrife

Photo of purple loosestrife flowering stalks showing purple flowers
Lythrum salicaria
Anyone who’s seen what purple loosestrife has done to New England and the Northeast can tell you how invasive this plant is. Learn how to identify it, so you can report any findings to the Missouri Department of Conservation. More

Purple Loosestrife

Photo of purple loosestrife flowering stalks showing purple flowers
Don’t be fooled by the pretty flowers—this plant is a disaster for the environment. Purple loosestrife invades wet habitats, such as freshwater marshes, fens, sedge meadows, and wet prairies, but also roadside ditches, on river- and stream banks and the edges of lakes and reservoirs. More

Purple Loosestrife (Colony)

Photo of purple loosestrife colony invading a shoreline
Anyone who’s seen what purple loosestrife has done to New England and the Northeast can tell you how invasive this plant is. Learn how to identify it, so you can report any findings to the Missouri Department of Conservation. More

Purple Loosestrife Invasive Species Fact Sheet

Use this print-and-carry sheet to identify and control invasive purple loosestrife on your Missouri property. More

Reed Canary Grass Invasive Species Fact Sheet

Use this print-and-carry sheet to identify and control invasive reed canary grass on your Missouri property. More

Sericea Lespedeza

Photo of large group of sericea lespedeza plants
Decades ago, sericea lespedeza was introduced in hopes it would provide hay, improve pastures, stop soil erosion, and supply food and cover for wildlife. Unfortunately, it has proven to be an aggressive, invasive weed that is extremely difficult to control, escapes cultivation, and outcompetes native plants. More