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Content tagged with "mustard"

Photo of black mustard plant growing in cracked pavement

Black Mustard

A native of Eurasia, black mustard is weedy and grows in fields, waste places, roadsides, and other disturbed areas. Until it was recently replaced by another species (brown mustard, which also is naturalized in Missouri) black mustard was the chief source of seed used in making table mustard.

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Photo of black mustard plants on the edge of a field

Black Mustard

Black mustard can grow to 5 feet tall. Next time you breeze past weedy black mustard on the highway or spot it in a fallow field, think of how important this and other mustards are to the world economy – and to your dinner table.

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Photo of black mustard flower cluster

Black Mustard

Brassica nigra
Next time you breeze past weedy black mustard on the highway or spot it in a fallow field, think of how important this and other mustards are to the world economy – and to your dinner table.

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Photo of black mustard flower cluster

Black Mustard (Flowers)

The flowers of black mustard are very small, yellow, and about 3/8 inch wide, with the 4 petals arranged like a cross. It blooms April–November. The fruits are long seedpods (technically, siliques) that form lower on the stalk as new flowers develop higher up.

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Photo of black mustard leaves

Black Mustard (Leaves)

The leaves of black mustard have long petioles and are highly variable, often irregularly lobed to the midrib, generally ovate, some with teeth.

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Photo of field cress flowers

Field Cress (Flowers)

Like other flowers in the mustard family, those of field cress have 4 small white petals arising from the many upper branches. It blooms April–June. The seedpods are nearly round.

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Photo of field cress flowers

Field Cress (Pepper Grass; Pepperweed)

Lepidium campestre
Also called cow cress, field cress is an Old World plant that was introduced to America long ago. In Missouri, it is weedy and found mainly in disturbed habitats such as pastures and roadsides.

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Photo of field cress plant

Field Cress (Plant)

Also called cow cress or pepperweed, field cress is an Old World plant that was introduced to America long ago. In Missouri, it is weedy and found mainly in disturbed habitats such as pastures and roadsides.

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Photo of garlic mustard plant with flowers

Garlic Mustard

Alliaria petiolata
Because each plant disperses a large number of seeds, garlic mustard can outcompete native vegetation for light, moisture, nutrients, soil, and space as it quickly colonizes an area.

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Photo of garlic mustard plant with flowers

Garlic Mustard

Because each plant disperses a large number of seeds, garlic mustard can out compete native vegetation for light, moisture, nutrients, soil, and space as it quickly colonizes an area.

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