Content tagged with "mushroom"

Common Split Gill

Photo of common split gill mushroom closeup of white brackets showing gills
Split gills grow in clusters with small, white, hairy, fan-shaped caps. Beneath, they have whitish or pinkish gill-like folds that split toward the edge. More

Common Split Gill

Photo of common split gills, white bracket mushrooms growing on branch
Common split gills grow on dead branches of deciduous trees and can be seen year-round. They are very common. More

Common Split Gill

Photo of common split gills, white bracket mushrooms growing on branch
Schizophyllum commune
Split gills grow in clusters with small, white, hairy, fan-shaped caps. Beneath, they have whitish or pinkish gill-like folds that split toward the edge. They grow on dead branches of deciduous trees. More

Common Split Gill

Photo of several common split gills, white bracket mushrooms, on a rotting log
Common split gills grow in groups on dead branches of deciduous trees. This is a very common and cute little mushroom. It is not edible, however. More

Common Split Gill Colony

Photo of colony of common split gills, white bracket fungi, on bark of dead tree
Split gills feed off of dead or dying trees, decomposing them in the process. This cleans the forest and helps nutrients to cycle back into the soil—an unglamorous but vital role in the ecosystem. More

Coral-Pink Merulius

Photo of coral-pink merulius, pink bracket mushrooms growing on wood
Phlebia incarnata (formerly Merulius incarnatus)
The coral-pink merulius is a small, semicircular bracket fungus that is pinkish to coral to cream-colored, wrinkled, and veined beneath. It grows on dead logs and stumps of deciduous trees. More

Coral-Pink Merulius

Photo of coral-pink merulius, pink bracket mushrooms growing on wood
A small, semicircular, bracket fungus that is pinkish to coral to cream-colored, wrinkled, and veined beneath. It grows on dead logs and stumps of deciduous trees. More

Crappie Francaise

Try this recipe for fresh crappie seasoned with lemon and herbs in a delicate morel sauce. More

Crown-Tipped Coral

Photo of cluster of pinkish crown-tipped coral mushrooms growing on rotting log
The fruiting body of this mushroom is branched, usually in 3-sided groupings, with crownlike tips. The color is yellowish, becoming tannish or, as in this specimen, pinkish. It grows on dead wood in the summertime. More

Crown-Tipped Coral

Closeup photo of crown-tipped coral, a whitish, branching mushroom, on a log
Although this species is edible, be careful: It has been known to cause gastrointestinal upset. Important clues for identifying a crown-tipped coral are: It is one of the few corals that grow on wood; if you take a tiny taste, it will be peppery; and the tips are crownlike, like the pinnacles of a tiny castle. More