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Content tagged with "mint"

Photo of dead nettle stalk with flowers

Dead Nettle

Lamium purpureum
Dead nettle, like its close relative henbit, is a common, weedy mint that, in early spring, can carpet wide patches of disturbed ground. Recognize dead nettle by the pyramidal look of its purple- or blue-tinted foliage.

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Photo of dittany flowers

Dittany

Cunila origanoides
Sometimes called "wild oregano," dittany (like true oregano) is a member of the mint family and can be used as a culinary herb and in teas. Look for it on dry, wooded slopes in Ozark counties.

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Photo of dittany flowers

Dittany

Sometimes called "wild oregano," dittany (like true oregano) is a member of the mint family and can be used as a culinary herb and in teas. Look for it on dry, wooded slopes in Ozark counties.

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Photo of downy skullcap flower clusters

Downy Skullcap

Scutellaria incana
Showy clusters of blue-violet, two-lipped flowers adorn downy skullcap. This native mint is found mostly in the southern half of the state.

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Photo of downy skullcap flower clusters

Downy Skullcap

Showy clusters of blue-violet, two-lipped flowers adorn downy skullcap. This native mint is found mostly in the southern half of the state.

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Photo of false dragonhead plant with flowers

False Dragonhead (Obedient Plant)

False dragonhead is a member of the mint family that grows 3-4 feet tall and forms dense spikes of pink or lavender snapdragon-like flowers. When you push one of the flowers sideways, it "obediently" stays in place for a while.

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Photo of false dragonhead closeup of flowers

False Dragonhead (Obedient Plant)

False dragonhead occurs in moist soils of fields, prairies, thickets, woodland openings and borders, along rivers and streams, and lakesides. It’s often grown in flower gardens, and special cultivars have been developed. It can spread aggressively, however.

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Photo of false dragonhead plant with flowers

False Dragonhead (Obedient Plant)

Physostegia virginiana
False dragonhead is a member of the mint family that grows 3-4 feet tall and forms dense spikes of pink or lavender snapdragon-like flowers. When you push one of the flowers sideways, it "obediently" stays in place for a while.

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Photo of henbit plants with flowers

Henbit

Henbit always draws attention in early spring when it blasts entire fields with the pinkish-purple of its flowers. A non-native weed that spreads abundantly, it causes few problems because it has shallow roots and fades before crops begin to grow.

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Photo of henbit plants with flowers

Henbit

Lamium amplexicaule
Henbit always draws attention in early spring when it blasts entire fields with the pinkish-purple of its flowers. A non-native weed that spreads abundantly, it causes few problems because it has shallow roots and fades before crops begin to grow.

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