Content tagged with "milkweed"

Mead’s Milkweed

Photo of Mead's milkweed flower cluster and upper stem leaves
Asclepias meadii
Mead’s milkweed, an endangered plant, once flourished in the tallgrass prairies of the Midwestern United States, including most of Missouri. More

Mead’s Milkweed

Photo of Mead's milkweed flower cluster and upper stem leaves
Mead’s milkweed, an endangered plant, once flourished in the tallgrass prairies of the Midwestern United States, including most of Missouri. More

Monarch Butterflies Could Use Your Help

Butterfly Milkweed
Helping monarch butterflies is as simple as planting milkweed. More

Monarch on Milkweed

A monarch butterfly perches on a milkweed flower
A monarch butterfly perches on a milkweed flower More

Purple Milkweed

Photo of purple milkweed flower cluster
Asclepias purpurascens
The flowers of purple milkweed are pale purple to reddish purple to dark purple, with greenish or red tints. The scientific name means “becoming purple”: The flowers start off rather pale and become more intensely purplish as they mature. More

Purple Milkweed

Photo of purple milkweed flower cluster
The flowers of purple milkweed are pale purple to reddish purple to dark purple, with greenish or red tints. The scientific name means “becoming purple”: The flowers start off rather pale and become more intensely purplish as they mature. More

Red Milkweed Beetle

Photo of a red milkweed beetle eating a common milkweed leaf.
The red milkweed beetle (Tetraopes tetrophthalmus) specializes in eating milkweeds. The larvae bore into the roots; the adults chew the foliage and leaves. The bright red is a warning: Like other insects that eat milkweeds, this beetle ingests milkweed’s toxic chemicals and becomes unpalatable or sickening to predators. “Tetraopes” means “four-eyed,” and beetles in this genus are sometimes called “four-eyed beetles.” Each eye is divided by an antenna base, making it look like two. A similar species is the red-femured milkweed borer (T. femoratus), whose antennae are black with white rings (not all black), legs are partially reddish (not all black), and commonly has smaller black dots. Look for these milkweed beetles in prairies and roadsides where milkweeds are abundant. More

Sand Vine (Climbing Milkweed; Blue Vine)

Photo of sand vine, leaves with flower cluster.
Beloved by bees, butterflies, and other insects for its nectar, sand vine is a problem weed of crop fields and gardens, where it can be difficult to eradicate. Some people cultivate it as an ornamental, and beekeepers value it as an excellent honey plant. More

Sand Vine (Climbing Milkweed; Blue Vine)

Photo of sand vine covering a bush.
Sand vine is a perennial, vigorous, aggressive climbing vine with stems that can reach lengths of 33 feet, covering fences and shrubs. More

Sand Vine (Climbing Milkweed; Blue Vine)

Photo of sand vine flowers.
The flowers of sand vine form in open groups arising on stalks from the leaf axils. The flowers are white, tiny, and strongly scented; the corolla lobes stand upright around a fleshy corona. It blooms July–September. More