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Content tagged with "migratory bird"

Ruby-throated hummingbird in flight

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Photo of a ruby-throated hummingbird in flight.

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Ruby-throated hummingbird in flight

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Archilochus colubris
Although a few western hummingbirds are occasionally seen in Missouri, this is by far the most common in our state and throughout the entire eastern United States.

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Photo of 2 sandhill cranes in corn stubble

Sandhill Crane

Grus canadensis
Sandhill cranes, sometimes mistaken for great blue herons, are rare migrants in Missouri that are becoming more common. They have a “bustle” of feathers over their short tail, and they fly with their necks straight out.

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Photo of 3 sandhill cranes at Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area

Sandhill Cranes at Eagle Bluffs CA

Sandhill cranes have a “bustle” of feathers over their short tail, and they fly with their necks straight out. These cranes visited the wetlands at Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area in Boone County in January 2012.

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Photo of 2 sandhill cranes in corn stubble

Sandhill Cranes at Squaw Creek NWR

Sandhill cranes, sometimes mistaken for great blue herons, are rare migrants in Missouri that are becoming more common. These cranes visited Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge in November 2011.

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Image of a male scarlet tanager

Scarlet Tanager

Piranga olivacea
During summer, scarlet tanagers feed on insects and fruit in the canopy of oak-hickory forests and in large shade trees of the eastern U.S. and southern Canada.

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Photo of female scarlet tanager held in a person's hand

Scarlet Tanager (Female)

Female scarlet tanagers are yellow below and olive above, with grayish wings and tail. The bill is smaller than that of the closely related summer tanager.

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Image of a male scarlet tanager

Scarlet Tanager (Male)

The upperparts of the male scarlet tanager are brilliant scarlet, with black wings and tail. The underparts are scarlet. In late summer, males molt to a female-like plumage. During the molting process, they are blotched with scarlet and yellow-olive.

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upland sandpapier

The Odyssey Birds

This content is archived
A bevy of migrating shorebirds sojourn in Missouri.

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Photo of a Wilson's snipe, a pudgy, long-billed bird, wading in a marsh.

Wilson’s Snipe

Wilson’s snipe, formerly called common snipe, is a migratory game bird commonly seen in spring and fall, foraging at marshes, swamps, wet pastures, crop stubble, and drainage ditches. A few individuals may be present during the summer, but they are not known to breed in the state. They can be a rare winter resident, mainly in southern Missouri.

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