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Content tagged with "migratory bird"

Photo of a barn swallow in flight.

Barn Swallow

Swallows are amazingly agile fliers and catch flying insects on the wing. They eat mostly flies, along with flying beetles, wasps, butterflies, and other relatively large insects.

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Photo of a barn swallow in flight.

Barn Swallow

Hirundo rustica
Streamlined, agile fliers with forked tails, barn swallows build cup-shaped nests out of mud affixed to protected areas on the walls of barns and under bridges.

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Photo of a barn swallow visiting its young in the nest.

Barn Swallow And Young In Nest

In order for the mud nests of barn swallows to adhere, the wall or concrete bridge they are attached to much have a slight ledge or a somewhat rough surface. Frequently a nail or the molding over a door will suffice.

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Photo of a barn swallow visiting its begging young in the nest.

Barn Swallow And Young In Nest

Swallows help control populations of the many flying insects they eat. Their peak presence in our state from April through September coincides with the time when insects are abundant and available for them to eat and to feed to their young.

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Photo of a juvenile barn swallow, perched.

Barn Swallow Juvenile

Juvenile barn swallows can be identified by their shorter tail feathers and by a generally paler coloration of the breast.

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Photo of two juvenile barn swallows, perched.

Barn Swallow Juveniles

Between April and September, young barn swallows progress from egg to nestling to independent juvenile. By the end of October, they have left with their parents for Central or South America.

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Photo of a barn swallow standing on ground holding dried grass in its bill.

Barn Swallow With Nesting Material

Barn swallows build cup-shaped nests out of mud they collect from muddy pools or stream banks. They strengthen the structure by mixing dried grasses into the mud. The nests are lined with plant materials and feathers.

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Photo of two young barn swallows looking out of their nest.

Barn Swallow Young In Nest

Although they originally built their nests in caves and under overhanging cliffs, today barn swallows almost always build their nests on human-built structures. They are a familiar sight in agricultural areas.

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Image of a bobolink

Bobolink

Dolichonyx oryzivorus
The bobolink is the only North American bird that has light feathers above and dark feathers below, coloration that helps bobolinks hide from predators in the blowing grasslands.

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Photo of a male cerulean warbler held in a hand

Cerulean Warbler

Setophaga cerulea (formerly Dendroica cerulea)
A summer resident in Missouri, the cerulean warbler is more common in the southeastern Ozarks but rare elsewhere in the state. Its numbers are small and declining, and for that reason our nation may soon classify it as endangered.

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