Search

Content tagged with "mammal"

If You Encounter a Mountain Lion

The chance of a meeting a mountain lion on a Missouri trail is almost zero, but knowing how to recognize and respond to threatening behaviors can help you avoid or survive a close encounter.

Read more

Photo of an Indiana myotis hanging from a cave ceiling.

Indiana Myotis (Indiana Bat)

The Indiana myotis, or Indiana bat, summers along streams and rivers in north Missouri, raising its young under the bark of certain trees. It is an endangered species.

Read more

Photo of an Indiana myotis hanging from a cave ceiling.

Indiana Myotis (Indiana Bat)

Myotis sodalis
The Indiana myotis, or Indiana bat, summers along streams and rivers in north Missouri, raising its young under the bark of certain trees. It is an endangered species.

Read more

Photo of least weasel

Least Weasel

Mustela nivalis
This mouse-sized weasel is found only in Missouri’s northern counties, and abundance varies locally and seasonally, depending on fluctuating rodent numbers—their favorite food.

Read more

Photo of least weasel

Least Weasel

The least weasel is mouse-sized. It is found only in Missouri’s northern counties, and abundance varies locally and seasonally, depending on fluctuating rodent numbers—their favorite food.

Read more

Mountain Lion

Linn County sighting confirmed to be a mountain lion

This content is archived
MDC confirms fifth report in recent months.

Read more

Photo of a little brown myotis hanging from cave wall with lesions on its wrist.

Little Brown Myotis (Little Brown Bat)

Myotis lucifugus
The little brown myotis (little brown bat) is one of our most common bats, but populations are declining. White-nose syndrome has taken a heavy toll in northeastern states. This species is now listed as vulnerable across its range.

Read more

Photo of a little brown myotis hanging from cave wall with lesions on its wrist.

Little Brown Myotis (Little Brown Bat)

Little brown myotises hibernate in winter limestone caves and mines, mostly in the Ozarks. In spring they disperse up to 620 miles. In spring and summer, females live in nursery colonies in cliff crevices and hollow trees, under loose bark, in attics, and other undisturbed retreats. Males are solitary or live in colonies up to 20 in similar protected sites, including under siding and shingles.

Read more

Photo of long-tailed weasel

Long-Tailed Weasel

Mustela frenata
These small but voracious predators are rare in our state but are most common in the south-central and southwestern portions. In summer, they are brown with yellow beneath. In winter their fur is paler or white. The tail has a black tip.

Read more