Content tagged with "loosestrife"

False Loosestrife (Bushy Seedbox)

Photo of a false loosestrife plant showing flowers, buds, and leaves.
The flowers of false loosestrife are on very short stalks arising from the leaf axils and have their parts in fours (4 sepals, 4 stamens, etc.). There are 4 bright yellow petals that often are shed the same day the flowers open. It blooms June–August. More

False Loosestrife (Bushy Seedbox)

Photo of false loosestrife plant showing branches, leaves, and flowers.
One of eleven water primrose species in Missouri, false loosestrife is distinguished by its cubical fruits that open at a pore in the tip. Look for it in wet places like the edges of ponds, ditches, and along rivers and streams. More

False Loosestrife (Bushy Seedbox)

Photo of a false loosestrife plant growing at the edge of a pond.
False loosestrife grows in wet places such as the margins of ponds and lakes, along streams, rivers, and spring branches, and in swamps, sloughs, and ditches. More

False Loosestrife (Bushy Seedbox; Rattlebox)

Photo of a false loosestrife plant showing flowers, buds, and leaves.
Ludwigia alternifolia
One of eleven water primrose species in Missouri, false loosestrife is distinguished by its cubical fruits that open at a pore in the tip. Look for it in wet places like the edges of ponds, ditches, and along rivers and streams. More

Lance-Leaved Loosestrife

Photo of lance-leaved loosestrife plant with flowers
Lysimachia lanceolata
You can find small colonies of lance-leaved loosestrife nearly throughout the state. It has showy but nodding yellow flowers and opposite, closely spaced, lanceolate or ovate leaves. More

Lance-Leaved Loosestrife

Photo of lance-leaved loosestrife plant with flowers
You can find small colonies of lance-leaved loosestrife nearly throughout the state. It has showy but nodding yellow flowers and opposite, closely spaced, lanceolate or ovate leaves. More

Narrow-Leaved Loosestrife

Photo of narrow-leaved loosestrife plant with flowers
Narrow-leaved loosestrife (Lysimachia quadriflora) is one of nine Lysimachia species recorded for Missouri. Note its narrow, linear leaves; where clusters of them develop on short stems in the main leaf axils, they can appear whorled. It grows in the Ozark and Ozark Border sections of our state. More

Purple Loosestrife

Photo of purple loosestrife flowering stalks showing purple flowers
Lythrum salicaria
Anyone who’s seen what purple loosestrife has done to New England and the Northeast can tell you how invasive this plant is. Learn how to identify it, so you can report any findings to the Missouri Department of Conservation. More

Purple Loosestrife

Photo of purple loosestrife flowering stalks showing purple flowers
Don’t be fooled by the pretty flowers—this plant is a disaster for the environment. Purple loosestrife invades wet habitats, such as freshwater marshes, fens, sedge meadows, and wet prairies, but also roadside ditches, on river- and stream banks and the edges of lakes and reservoirs. More

Purple Loosestrife (Colony)

Photo of purple loosestrife colony invading a shoreline
Anyone who’s seen what purple loosestrife has done to New England and the Northeast can tell you how invasive this plant is. Learn how to identify it, so you can report any findings to the Missouri Department of Conservation. More