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Content tagged with "longhorned beetle"

Photo of a red milkweed beetle eating a common milkweed leaf.

Red Milkweed Beetle

The red milkweed beetle (Tetraopes tetrophthalmus) specializes in eating milkweeds. The larvae bore into the roots; the adults chew the foliage and leaves. The bright red is a warning: Like other insects that eat milkweeds, this beetle ingests milkweed’s toxic chemicals and becomes unpalatable or sickening to predators. “Tetraopes” means “four-eyed,” and beetles in this genus are sometimes called “four-eyed beetles.” Each eye is divided by an antenna base, making it look like two. A similar species is the red-femured milkweed borer (T. femoratus), whose antennae are black with white rings (not all black), legs are partially reddish (not all black), and commonly has smaller black dots. Look for these milkweed beetles in prairies and roadsides where milkweeds are abundant.

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Photo of red-femured milkweed borer beetle on milkweed leaf

Red-Femured Milkweed Borer (Red Milkweed Beetle)

The red-femured milkweed borer (Tetraopes femoratus) specializes in eating milkweeds. The larvae bore into the roots; the adults chew the foliage and leaves. The bright red is a warning: Like other insects that eat milkweeds, this beetle ingests milkweed’s toxic chemicals and becomes unpalatable or sickening to predators. “Tetraopes” means “four-eyed,” and beetles in this genus are sometimes called “four-eyed beetles.” Each eye is divided by an antenna base, making it look like two. A similar species is the red milkweed beetle (T. tetrophthalmus), whose antennae are all black (lacking the white rings), legs are all black (not partially reddish), and commonly has larger black dots. Look for these milkweed beetles in prairies and roadsides where milkweeds are abundant.

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image of Red-Headed Ash Borer on tree

Red-Headed Ash Borer

The larvae of red-headed ash borer (Neoclytus acuminatus) feed on a variety of dead or dying hardwoods, including oak, hickory, persimmon, hackberry, as well as ash. This helps the decomposition process and thus enriches the soil. They can damage felled wood intended for lumber and sometimes emerge from firewood carried indoors and not yet burned.

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