Content tagged with "legume"

White and Yellow Sweet Clovers

Photo of white sweet clover flower cluster showing stalk and flowers.
Melilotus albus and M. officinale
These two species of sweet clover are present all over America. Although they have been planted for forage, as bee plants, and as nitrogen-fixers, white and yellow sweet clover are now classified as invasive for their weediness and the problems they pose for natural habitats. More

White Prairie Clover

Photo of white prairie clover flowerhead.
White prairie clover (D. candida) is much like purple prairie clover, only the blossoms are white. More

White Sweet Clover

Photo of white sweet clover flower cluster showing stalk and flowers.
The flowers of white sweet clover, like those of yellow sweet clover, are crowded densely on the top 4 inches of an elongated stem. Each tiny flower is attached to the stem by a minute stalk. Each small pea-like flower produces one or two seeds, and it blooms May through October. Its ability to set thousands of seeds, each of which can stay viable for more than 30 years, is one reason it is invasive. More

White Wild Indigo

Photo of white wild indigo plant with flowering stalk amid prairie grasses
White wild indigo is the tallest species of false indigo in Missouri. It has a robust, striking presence, with white flowers and a shrubby look. Look for it statewide, in prairies and glades and along roadsides, streams, and valleys. More

White Wild Indigo

Photo of white wild indigo plant with flowering stalk amid prairie grasses
Baptisia alba (formerly B. leucantha)
White wild indigo is the tallest species of false indigo in Missouri. It has a robust, striking presence, with white flowers and a shrubby look. Look for it statewide, in prairies and glades and along roadsides, streams, and valleys. More

Yellow Sweet Clover

Photo of yellow sweet clover plants in a large colony
Yellow sweet clover is present all over America. Although it has been planted for forage, as a bee plant, and as a nitrogen-fixer, this and the very similar white sweet clover are now classified as invasive for their weediness and the problems they pose for natural habitats. More

Yellowwood

yellowwood
Cladrastis kentukea
Early Appalachian settlers named this plant yellowwood because the root bark could be used to produce a clear yellow dye. This slow-growing tree is often planted as an ornamental, but in the wild it is uncommon to endangered throughout its natural range. More