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Content tagged with "legume"

Photo of lead plant showing shrubby growth habit

Lead Plant

Lead plant is a small, branching, shrubby perennial. It is densely hairy and can become woody with age, but some winters it dies back to the ground.

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Photo of lead plant showing flowers and leaves

Lead Plant

Amorpha canescens
Lead plant is a densely hairy small shrub producing tight, elongated spikes of small purple flowers from May through August. It grows in prairies, glades, and savannas.

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Photo of lead plant showing blooming stalks

Lead Plant

Lead plant is fairly popular as a drought-resistant flowering shrub in native wildflower gardening.

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Photo of lead plant showing grayish hairy foliage

Lead Plant

The name “lead plant” apparently came from the outdated belief that this plant grew in places where lead was in the ground, indicating that metal’s presence. Maybe the association arose from the grayish look of the hairy foliage.

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Photo of lead plant in a tallgrass prairie setting

Lead Plant

Lead plant grows in prairies, glades, and savannas. It is a true prairie plant. Its deep roots enable it to survive the occasional fires that keep native prairies from turning into forests.

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Photo of lead plant showing flower stalks in bud

Lead Plant (Flower Buds)

Lead plant blooms May-August. Its presence is considered an indicator of high-quality prairie.

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Photo of lead plant showing purple flower clusters

Lead Plant (Flowers)

The flowers of lead plant are tiny and massed in tight, elongated spikes. The stamens have reddish filaments and yellow anthers and protrude from the flowers. The lavender or purple corolla is reduced to a single, top petal.

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Photo of long-bracted wild indigo plant with flowers

Long-Bracted Wild Indigo

A common native prairie legume, long-bracted wild indigo flowers April–June, while the surrounding vegetation is still short. Its racemes of creamy-white pea flowers mature into oval pods with tapering beaks.

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Photo of long-bracted wild indigo plant with flowers

Long-Bracted Wild Indigo

Also called cream wild indigo, long-bracted wild indigo is a good indicator of former prairies, glades, and savannas. The early-blooming flowers provide food for queen bumblebees when they emerge from winter hibernation, which helps get their colonies off to a good start.

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Photo of long-bracted wild indigo plant with flowers

Long-Bracted Wild Indigo

Baptisia bracteata (formerly B. leucophaea)
Long-bracted wild indigo flowers April–June, while the surrounding vegetation is still short. Its racemes of creamy-white pea flowers mature into oval pods with tapering beaks.

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