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Content tagged with "legume"

Photo of hairy vetch flower clusters and leaves

Hairy Vetch (Woolly Vetch; Winter Vetch)

Vicia villosa
Branching, spreading, and tangling, hairy vetch forms dense colonies along highways and other disturbed sites. This softly hairy ground-covering plant has one-sided clusters of purple pea flowers.

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Photo of a tangled patch of hairy vetch plants

Hairy Vetch (Woolly Vetch; Winter Vetch)

Hairy vetch is common on disturbed ground. A native of Europe, it has been much planted along highways by the Missouri Department of Transportation to prevent erosion after road construction projects.

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Photo of hairy vetch flower clusters and leaves

Hairy Vetch (Woolly Vetch; Winter Vetch)

Branching, spreading, and tangling, hairy vetch forms dense colonies along highways and other disturbed sites. This softly hairy ground-covering plant has one-sided clusters of purple pea flowers.

Read more

honey locust

Honey Locust

Gleditsia triacanthos
Though it doesn’t reach a “stately” size, honey locust commands respect because of its many large, strong, usually branched thorns, which can puncture tractor tires as easily as they can poke through tennis shoes! The long, leathery, twisting pods are relished by cattle and by wildlife.

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kentucky coffee tree

Kentucky Coffee Tree

Gymnocladus dioicus
There’s no mistaking this tree when its large, tough seedpods are hanging from its limbs or dropping to the ground below. Unpopular as food with today’s wildlife, these seedpods might have been a food source for mastodons and other large, extinct North American mammals.

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Photo of Korean lespedeza plant with flowers

Korean Lespedeza (Korean Clover)

Kummerowia stipulacea (formerly Lespedeza stipulacea)
Korean lespedeza is an Asian clover that was introduced to North America to prevent erosion, to feed wildlife and livestock, and, since it is a legume, to add nitrogen to the soil. A weedy plant, it has spread statewide since the 1930s.

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Photo of Korean lespedeza plant with flowers

Korean Lespedeza (Korean Clover)

Korean lespedeza is an Asian clover that was introduced to North America to prevent erosion, to feed wildlife and livestock, and, since it is a legume, to add nitrogen to the soil. A weedy plant, it has spread statewide since the 1930s.

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Photo of a huge mass of kudzu vines covering trees and ground

Kudzu

Pueraria montana
Of the many invasive exotic plants that were originally introduced to stop soil erosion and improve soils, kudzu is one of the worst. This “vine that ate the South” is often the first plant that comes to mind when we think of “invasive exotics.”

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Photo of a huge mass of kudzu vines covering trees and ground

Kudzu

Of the many invasive exotic plants that were originally introduced to stop soil erosion and improve soils, kudzu is one of the worst. This “vine that ate the South” is often the first plant that comes to mind when we think of “invasive exotics.”

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Photo of lead plant showing flowers and leaves

Lead Plant

Lead plant is a densely hairy small shrub producing tight, elongated spikes of small purple flowers from May through August. It grows in prairies, glades, and savannas.

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