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Content tagged with "legume"

Photo of bird's-foot trefoil, closeup of flower cluster.

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

The flowers of bird's-foot trefoil grow in umbels, at the tips of the stalks, and have the typical configuration of pea flowers. This plant blooms May–September.

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Photo of bird's-foot trefoil, closeup of flower cluster.

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Lotus corniculatus
Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are cloverlike, with two leafy stipules at the base of each.

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Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Bird’s-foot trefoil forms low patches of bright yellow flowers along roadsides, having been planted to stabilize soil after road construction. Up close, it clearly has pea flowers. The leaves are trifoliate, with two leafy stipules at the base of each.

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Photo of bird’s-foot trefoil plant with flowers

Bird’s-Foot Trefoil

Bird’s-foot trefoil produces its bright golden yellow flowers from May to September. A native of Europe, it has a worldwide distribution. It is used as a low-growing groundcover, soil stabilizer, and forage and cover crop.

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Image of a black locust leaf

Black Locust

Robinia pseudoacacia
This tree, a member of the bean family, is easy to appreciate in May and June, when its showy white clusters of flowers perfume the breeze with their sweet smell. Bees like the flowers, too.

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Photo of black medick, a yellow, cloverlike wildflower, held in a hand

Black Medick

Black medick occurs in fields, lawns, waste places, and along roads and railroads. A native of Eurasia and Africa, it was introduced and has naturalized across much of North America. It is a nutritious but low-yielding legume for grazing animals and is not much planted in our area.

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Photo of black medick closeup of cloverlike yellow flowerhead

Black Medick

Medicago lupulina
The small, cloverlike flowering heads and trifoliate leaves of black medick are clues that this plant is in the Fabaceae, the bean or pea family. An introduced, weedy species, it is closely related to alfalfa.

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Photo of black medick closeup of cloverlike yellow flowerhead

Black Medick (Flower)

The small, cloverlike flowering heads and trifoliate leaves of black medick are clues that this plant is in the Fabaceae, the bean or pea family. An introduced, weedy species, it is closely related to alfalfa.

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Photo of blue false indigo flowering stalk

Blue False Indigo

Baptisia australis
Blue false indigo is a native bushy perennial with three-parted compound leaves and showy, upright stalks of blue pea flowers. The seedpods are inflated and turn black upon maturity, and the seeds rattle around in the dry pods.

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Photo of blue false indigo flowering stalk

Blue False Indigo

Blue false indigo is a native bushy perennial with three-parted compound leaves and showy, upright stalks of blue pea-flowers. The seedpods are inflated and turn black upon maturity, and the seeds rattle around in the dry pods.

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