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Content tagged with "invasive species"

Photo of common teasel showing opposite, unlobed leaves.

Common Teasel (Leaves)

The stem leaves of common teasel are not lobed, and though they are often fused at the base, they don’t form a cuplike structure around the stem.

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Spotted Knapweed Flower

Controlling the scourge of invasive spotted knapweed

This content is archived
Invasive species, such as spotted knapweed, are a top threat to Missouri’s native plants and animals.

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Photo of crown vetch showing flowers and leaves.

Crown Vetch

Crown vetch prefers open, sunny areas. It occurs along roadsides and other rights-of-way, in open fields, and on gravel bars along streams. It is found most easily when it is blooming, when its profuse pinkish blossoms are conspicuous.

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Photo of crown vetch, closeup of a flower cluster.

Crown Vetch

Securigera varia (formerly Coronilla varia)
When you drive through Missouri in the summer, you’re almost guaranteed to see the pink flower clusters of crown vetch, whose masses of green foliage coat the right-of-ways along highways. This weedy plant stabilizes the dirt after road construction but degrades our natural ecosystems.

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Photo of crown vetch plants with flowers

Crown Vetch

When you drive through Missouri in the summer, you’re almost guaranteed to see the pink flower clusters of crown vetch, whose masses of green foliage coat the right-of-ways along highways. This weedy plant stabilizes the dirt after road construction but degrades our natural ecosystems.

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Crown Vetch

pdf (542.7 K)
Use this publication to learn how to identify and control Crown vetch.

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Photo of crown vetch, closeup of a flower cluster.

Crown Vetch (Flowers)

Crown vetch blooms May through August. Its flowers are pinkish to white and are in crown-shaped clusters. Each individual flower is shaped like a typical pea flower.

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Crown Vetch Control

Learn to identify and control this invasive plant in Missouri.

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Photo of a large curly pondweed colony in a pond

Curled Pondweed (Curly Pondweed; Beginners’ Pondweed)

Curled pondweed (Potamogeton crispus) was introduced from Eurasia and is considered a noxious, invasive weed in many parts of North America.

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Photo of curled pondweed closeup of leaves in a person's hand

Curled Pondweed (Curly Pondweed; Beginners’ Pondweed)

Curled pondweed (Potamogeton crispus), an introduced weed, has long, narrow, stemless leaves that have wavy, serrated margins.

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