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Content tagged with "invasive species"

Photo of Canada thistle flowers

Canada Thistle

Canada thistle is a native to Eurasia and arrived on our continent probably before the Revolutionary War—most likely mixed in agricultural seed. A bad weed of crop fields and rangeland farther north, it causes problems in Missouri, too.

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Photo of Canada thistle flowers

Canada Thistle

Cirsium arvense
Canada thistle is a native to Eurasia and arrived on our continent probably before the Revolutionary War—most likely mixed in agricultural seed. A bad weed of crop fields and rangeland farther north, it causes problems in Missouri, too.

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Photo of Canada thistle flowers

Canada Thistle Control

Learn to identify and control this invasive plant.

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Image of a bighead carp

Carp Lemonade

This content is archived
Making the best out of some big-headed invaders.

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Caucasian Bluestem

Bothriochloa bladhii
Causasian bluestem and the closely related yellow bluestem are both aggressive, weedy degraders of pasturelands that escape cultivation and endanger native habitats. Learn more about these Old World grasses, and please don’t plant them!

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Chinese Mystery Snail

Cipangopaludina chinensis malleata
The Chinese mystery snail is an invasive species quickly taking over urban waters throughout the state. These Asian snails are popular with aquarium hobbyists, and some people appreciate them as food.

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Download this map in showing the distribution of Chinese mystery snails in Missouri.

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Photo of Chinese yam showing leaves and bulbils

Chinese Yam

Dioscorea oppositifolia (sometimes called D. batatas)
Similar to kudzu, Chinese yam is an aggressive vine that overtakes nearly everything within reach that stands still long enough! Learn more about this invasive plant—and please don’t plant it!

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Photo of Chinese yam showing leaves and bulbils

Chinese Yam (Bulbils and Leaves)

New vines quickly sprout from the bulbils of Chinese yam. These drop off the vine and are carried to new locations by water or rodents or in topsoil moved for construction purposes. Even a small piece of a bulbil will sprout into a new vine, the way a small piece of a potato can create a new plant. The bulbils can overwinter and form new vines in spring.

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Photo of Chinese yam vine showing bulbils

Chinese Yam (Bulbils)

Although Chinese yam is not known to produce seed in the United States, it produces bulbils, which resemble tiny Irish potatoes and are not technically fruits, in the leaf axils.

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