Content tagged with "invasive"

Bighead Carp

Image of a bighead carp
Hypophthalmichthys nobilis
This invasive Asian carp is not as frequent a jumper as its cousin, the silver carp, but it also leaps from the water when disturbed, threatening boaters' safety. More

Black Carp

Mylopharyngodon piceus
This large, invasive carp from Asia eats mussels and snails and can damage populations of native mollusks. It is illegal to transport live black carp across state lines. More

Bush Honeysuckles

Image of a bush honeysuckles
Lonicera maackii (Amur) and Lonicera x bella (Bella)
If you’ve got a giant green thicket in your woods, you may have a bush honeysuckle infestation. These invasive plants are shrubby natives of Asia. Here in America, where they have no natural controls, they leaf out early, grow fast, spread fast and form dense thickets that crowd out Missouri’s native forest plants. More

Callery Pear (Bradford Pear)

Callery Pear
Pyrus calleryana
Sometimes a specific variety of a tree becomes so popular that the whole species becomes known by that name. This is the case with the widely planted 'Bradford' callery pear. Although callery pear has been hugely popular in landscaping, it can escape and hybridize with relatives. Alarmingly, it has become an invasive plant. Learn more about this problem, so you can choose your landscaping trees wisely! More

Common Buckthorn

Rhamnus cathartica
You might see it for sale at a nursery, but don’t buy it! At least six states have banned this invasive exotic, and the difficult-to-control plant is causing problems here in Missouri, too. Learn how to identify it—and avoid it! More

Crayfish Regulation Discussions Continue

This content is archived
large green and rusty-brown grayfish
Conservation officials will use the time to address concerns of bait shops and fish farms. More

Emerald Ash Borer

Image of emerald ash borer (dead adult specimen).
Emerald ash borer (dead adult specimen). More

Eurasian Collared-Dove

Photo of Eurasian collared-dove perched on a stump
The Eurasian collared-dove has a black crescent “collar” on the upper back (not a complete "ring"). The song is a three-parted “coo-coo-cook” or “coo-COO-coo,” often repeated incessantly; the call is a raspy, nasal, descending “heeeewww.” More

Eurasian Collared-Dove

Photo of Eurasian collared-dove walking on grass
The Eurasian collared-dove was introduced in the Bahamas and has rapidly spread throughout most of the United States. At first glance, it looks like a chunky, pale gray mourning dove. More

Eurasian Collared-Dove

Photo of Eurasian collared-dove walking on grass
Streptopelia decaocto
The Eurasian collared-dove was introduced in the Bahamas and has rapidly spread throughout most of the United States. At first glance, it looks like a chunky, pale gray mourning dove. More