Content tagged with "horntail"

European Wood Wasp (Emerging Female)

Photo of European wood wasp female emerging from wood
This invasive insect lives for about a year as a grublike larva inside the trunks of trees, then pupates, transforming into an adult. In our area, new adults would probably emerge from tree trunks July through September. More

European Wood Wasp (Sirex Woodwasp)

Photo of male and female European wood wasps on pine stump
European wood wasp, female (left) and male (right). This species is known to cause the death of up to 80 percent of the pine trees in an area, and it could soon arrive in Missouri. Help protect our pines by learning how to identify this troublesome insect. More

European Wood Wasp (Sirex Woodwasp)

Photo of male and female European wood wasps on pine stump
Sirex noctilio
The European wood wasp, or sirex woodwasp, is known to cause the death of up to 80 percent of the pine trees in an area, and it could soon arrive in Missouri. Help protect our pines by learning how to identify this troublesome insect. More

European Wood Wasp Larva

Photo of European wood wasp larva in gallery in pine wood
The larvae of European wood wasps are creamy white, legless, with a dark spine at the hind end, and thus look very much like the larvae of our native horntail species. They have a symbiotic fungus that causes the tree tissues to deteriorate; the larvae feed on the fungus as they tunnel through the wood. Unfortunately, this process kills the tree entirely. More

Horntails

Photo of a Pigeon Tremex Horntail
About 28 species in North America
Horntails look a lot like wasps but have a taillike spine that projects from the tip of the abdomen. Their cylindrical bodies also lack the narrow waist so common in wasps. More

Pigeon Tremex

Photo of a Pigeon Tremex Horntail
One of the common horntails is the pigeon tremex (Tremex columba). Like other horntails, it is wasplike, but with a taillike spine that projects from the tip of the abdomen. The body is cylindrical and lacks the narrow waist so common in wasps. It can be 2 inches long, and it neither stings nor bites people. More