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Content tagged with "honeysuckle"

Japanese Honeysuckle

Lonicera japonica
You might enjoy its fragrance, but don’t kid yourself about this invasive, exotic vine: Japanese honeysuckle is an aggressive colonizer that shades out native plants and harms natural communities. Learn how to recognize it!

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Japanese Honeysuckle Control

Learn to identify and control this invasive vine in Missouri.

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Use this print-and-carry sheet to identify and control invasive Japanese honeysuckle in Missouri.

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Landowner Assistance

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"Landowner Assistance" for the April 2007 Missouri Conservationist.

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Photo of limber honeysuckle flowers

Limber Honeysuckle (Flowers)

Identify our native limber honeysuckle by its crowded clusters of tubular, yellow or greenish-yellow flowers, tinged with red, purple, or pink, that are noticeably enlarged on one side at the base.

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Photo of limber honeysuckle fruits

Limber Honeysuckle (Fruits)

The leaves of limber honeysuckle are opposite and simple, with the upper pair just below the flowers united to form a disk that is longer than broad; the leaves below the disk are not united. The berries are orange-red to red when mature.

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Photo of limber honeysuckle flowers

Limber Honeysuckle (Wild Honeysuckle; Red Honeysuckle)

Lonicera dioica
This native Missouri honeysuckle is uncommon and widely scattered in the state, but it does well as a trellis vine in the native landscape garden. Identify it by its crowded clusters of tubular, yellow or greenish-yellow flowers, tinged with red, purple, or pink, that are noticeably enlarged on one side at the base.

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Image of a bush honeysuckles

MDC's Forest 44 Area and part of Busch Conservation Area closing one day in November for invasive plant control

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New Videos Help Fight Invasive Species

I just received a notice of a new video, available online, that’s aimed at helping outdoors people identify and fight invasive species.

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Whack Bush Honeysuckle Now!

When I moved from Northwest Missouri to the Ozark Border Region of central Missouri in 2004, I had no idea of the battle I would encounter with invasive species on my new farm.

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