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Content tagged with "honeysuckle"

Barb Ostmann begins weaving her basket at a DNW workshop at Twin Pines

It’s Not Paper or Plastic, It’s Oak or Hickory

Long before the supermarket began offering a choice of paper or plastic, early Ozarkers had the choice of oak or hickory baskets to carry their goods and treasures. Today baskets can be made of exotic plants, meaning habitat improvement is woven into an Ozarks tradition.

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Japanese Honeysuckle

Lonicera japonica
You might enjoy its fragrance, but don’t kid yourself about this invasive, exotic vine: Japanese honeysuckle is an aggressive colonizer that shades out native plants and harms natural communities. Learn how to recognize it!

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Japanese Honeysuckle Control

Learn to identify and control this invasive vine in Missouri.

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Use this print-and-carry sheet to identify and control invasive Japanese honeysuckle in Missouri.

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Landowner Assistance

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"Landowner Assistance" for the April 2007 Missouri Conservationist.

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Photo of limber honeysuckle flowers

Limber Honeysuckle (Flowers)

Identify our native limber honeysuckle by its crowded clusters of tubular, yellow or greenish-yellow flowers, tinged with red, purple, or pink, that are noticeably enlarged on one side at the base.

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Photo of limber honeysuckle fruits

Limber Honeysuckle (Fruits)

The leaves of limber honeysuckle are opposite and simple, with the upper pair just below the flowers united to form a disk that is longer than broad; the leaves below the disk are not united. The berries are orange-red to red when mature.

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Photo of limber honeysuckle flowers

Limber Honeysuckle (Wild Honeysuckle; Red Honeysuckle)

Lonicera dioica
This native Missouri honeysuckle is uncommon and widely scattered in the state, but it does well as a trellis vine in the native landscape garden. Identify it by its crowded clusters of tubular, yellow or greenish-yellow flowers, tinged with red, purple, or pink, that are noticeably enlarged on one side at the base.

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MDC says now is the time to defend against invasive bush honeysuckle

The exotic plant threatens to take over the St. Louis area, but late autumn is one of the best times to stop it.

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Image of a bush honeysuckles

MDC's Forest 44 Area and part of Busch Conservation Area closing one day in November for invasive plant control

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