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Content tagged with "grass"

Landowner Assistance

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"Landowner Assistance" for the April 2007 Missouri Conservationist.

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Landowner Spraying Fescue

Missouri landowners who want more wildlife eradicate fescue to improve rabbit, quail and songbird habitat.

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Managing Fescue

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Working around fescue to create quality wildlife habitat.

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Native Warm-Season Grass Pastures

Add native warm-season grasses to your Missouri pastures to improve summer livestock forage and wildlife habitat.

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Use this print-and-carry sheet to identify and control invasive Old World bluestem grasses on your Missouri property.

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Photo of poverty grass clump amid fallen autumn leaves.

Poverty Grass (Curly Oat Grass)

Poverty grass (Danthonia spicata) is one grass species you can recognize by its leaves alone. The basal leaves persist for several years, becoming dry, strawlike, and curly. Although the flowering stems can be 2 feet high, the basal leaves remain low, only getting about 5 inches long. Poverty grass is common nearly statewide in dry upland forests, prairies, glades, old fields, roadsides, and other dry, disturbed areas, usually in acidic soils. Hikers frequently see it in dry upland Ozark woods.

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Queen of the Kingdom of Callaway

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Eastern gamagrass returns to a central Missouri farm.

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Photo of several reed canary grass plants with flowering heads

Reed Canary Grass

Phalaris arundinacea
Reed canary grass is native to Europe, Asia, and North America, and it varies quite a bit. Our native Missouri version, for instance, is quite different from the Eurasian type that has been widely introduced—and which has proven to be highly invasive.

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Photo of several reed canary grass plants with flowering heads

Reed Canary Grass

Reed canary grass is native to Europe, Asia, and North America, and it varies quite a bit. Our native Missouri version, for instance, is quite different from the Eurasian type that has been widely introduced—and which has proven to be highly invasive.

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Reed Canary Grass Control

Learn to identify and control this invasive grass on your Missouri property.

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