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Content tagged with "grass"

Photo of Indian grass culm, held in a hand showing pointed auricle.

Indian Grass (Auricle)

Indian grass (Sorghastrum nutans) is one of our most important native warm-season tallgrasses. You can easily confirm your identification by noting its pair of stiff, pointed, clawlike auricles where the leaf blade attaches to the sheath. Auricles, hairs, and other structures at the junction of blade and sheath can be important in identifying grasses.

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Photo of Japanese stiltgrass

Japanese Stiltgrass

Japanese stiltgrass in an invasive annual grass with thin, pale green, lance-shaped leaves that are 3 inches long. The midvein of the leaf is off-center and has a distinct silvery stripe of reflective hairs. Each plant produces hundreds of small, yellow-to-red seeds that can remain viable for five years.

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Photo of Japanese stiltgrass

Japanese Stiltgrass

Japanese stiltgrass is invasive and has spread to nearly every eastern U.S. state. It forms dense patches, displacing and outcompeting native species for nutrients and light. In some cases, stiltgrass has been known to completely replace ground vegetation in three to five years.

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Photo of Japanese stiltgrass

Japanese Stiltgrass (Eulalia)

Microstegium vimineum
Japanese stiltgrass is an invasive annual grass with thin, pale green, lance-shaped leaves that are 3 inches long. It has spread to nearly every eastern U.S. state. It forms dense patches, displacing and outcompeting native species for nutrients and light.

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Photo of Johnson grass flower clusters

Johnson Grass

Sorghum halepense
Johnson grass is a native of the Mediterranean that is invasive in our country. It’s a weed that infests cropland and degrades native ecosystems, and heavy infestations are found in all the major river bottoms of Missouri.

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Photo of Johnson grass panicles against a blue sky

Johnson Grass

Johnson grass is native to the Mediterranean and now occurs in warm-temperate regions worldwide. It is common in the southern United States. Heavy infestations in river bottoms can reduce corn or soybean yields in Missouri to a few bushels per acre. More than 300,000 acres are infested in the Missouri Bootheel alone.

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Photo of Johnson grass, big clump next to a field

Johnson Grass

Johnson grass is a tall, coarse, perennial grass with stout rhizomes. It grows in dense clumps or nearly solid stands in crop fields, pastures, abandoned fields, rights-of-way, and forest edges and along stream banks.

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Photo of Johnson grass flower clusters

Johnson Grass (Flower Clusters)

The flower clusters (panicles) of Johnson grass are large, loosely branched, purplish, and hairy. The spikelets (the small flowering units) occur in pairs or threes, and each has a conspicuous awn. It blooms June through November.

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Johnson Grass Control

Learn to identify and control this invasive grass in Missouri.

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Photo of Johnson grass infesting a crop field

Johnson Grass Infesting A Crop Field

Johnson grass is a native of the Mediterranean that is invasive in our country. It’s a weed that infests cropland and degrades native ecosystems, and heavy infestations are found in all the major river bottoms of Missouri.

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