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Content tagged with "gamebird"

Photo of a male blue-winged teal.

Blue-Winged Teal Male

Blue-winged teal are dabblers, often seen in shallows sifting water and mud for goodies, rarely diving but able to take flight by jumping directly from the water into the air.

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Photo of a male blue-winged teal closeup of head.

Blue-Winged Teal Male

Male blue-winged teal have a distinctive white crescent on their dark gray heads. The light blue patch on the forewing, and the greenish speculum (wing patch), are often hard to see unless the duck is in flight.

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Photo of two Canada geese and a white-fronted goose standing near a lake.

Canada Geese and White-Fronted Goose

Migratory animals play a role in every ecosystem they travel through, as well as in their breeding and overwintering places. Although it takes a fairly large predator to capture an adult goose, the defenseless young and eggs fall prey to a variety of meat-eaters.

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Photo of Canada goose swimming

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis
Canada geese are recognizable by their brownish bodies, black necks and heads, and a distinctive broad white patch that runs beneath their heads from ear to ear.

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Photo of a male canvasback floating on the water.

Canvasback

Aythya valisineria
A diving duck or pochard, the canvasback forages on the bottom of lakes, rivers, and marshes for invertebrates and plants. It is a common migrant in Missouri.

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Photo of a female canvasback floating on the water.

Canvasback Female

The female canvasback is light brown, with a grayish back and sides. Note the distinctly long, sloping, blackish forehead and bill.

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Photo of a male canvasback floating on the water.

Canvasback Male

The adult male canvasback has a chestnut head, a notably long, sloping, blackish bill, a black chest and under tail coverts, and a white body. Like other bay ducks (also called diving ducks or pochards), canvasback typically dive completely underwater.

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Photo of a male canvasback floating on water.

Canvasback Male

Duck hunting is a large industry in the United States. The canvasback was long considered one of the best-tasting species. Humans play a big role in conserving canvasback populations: We must protect their habitat, especially their breeding grounds.

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Photo of five canvasbacks floating on a lake, apparently asleep.

Canvasbacks

Canvasback are usually seen on lakes, rivers, and marshes. In Missouri, they are most common along the Mississippi River. Compared to other diving ducks in this genus, canvasback are more frequently found in deeper water. They are often observed in fall and winter in large “rafts” or groups on open water.

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Photo of a male common merganser floating on water.

Common Merganser

Mergus merganser
Like our other mergansers, the common merganser has a long, slender, serrated bill and dives underwater for fish. This species, however, has only a short head crest and has unique color patterns.

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