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Content tagged with "gamebird"

Gray Partridge

Perdix perdix
Introduced from Eurasia and uncommon in Missouri, the gray partridge is a favorite of gamebird hunters.

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Green-Winged Teal

Green-Winged Teal

Anas crecca
The green-winged teal is a fast, graceful flyer with an iridescent green wing patch. Teals are relatively small dabbling ducks and have been called the “bantams of the duck tribe.”

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Photograph of a male Hooded Merganser swimming

Hooded Merganser

Lophodytes cucullatus
Hooded mergansers have crests that trail behind the head or can be raised to create a circular shape. Their bills are narrow and serrated. Males are black and white with chestnut flanks; females are brown.

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Lesser Scaup

Aythya affinis
The male lesser scaup is a diving duck with a black head and chest, white sides, and black tail end. One way to tell it from the similar greater scaup is to note its peaked (not rounded) head.

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Photo of male and female mallards walking on ice

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos
The mallard is probably the most familiar duck in all of North America. The male has a green head and chestnut breast. Both sexes have a blue speculum (wing patch) bordered on both sides by white.

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Photo of mallard flock in wetlands

Mallard Flock In Wetlands

In Missouri, the mallard is a common migrant on lakes, rivers, ponds, and marshes. As a locally uncommon summer resident, they may nest along lakeshores and in marshes statewide. They are very common in winter, even during severely cold weather when most other waterfowl migrate farther south.

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Photo of mallard hen with chicks

Mallard Hen And Chicks

Upon hatching, mallard chicks are covered with down and can follow their mother around within a day. They, and similarly capable young of most other ground-nesting birds, are described as “precocial young.” They contrast greatly with the naked, helpless young of most tree-nesting birds.

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Photo of male mallard in flight

Mallard Male In Flight

The mallard is probably the most familiar duck in all of North America. The male has a green head and chestnut breast. Mallards can take flight directly from the water’s surface without needing a running start.

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Photo of mallard nest with eggs

Mallard Nest With Eggs

Female mallards make nests and lay eggs in early spring. Nests are usually built on the ground of grasses, twigs, and other vegetation, and lined with down from the mother’s breast. Clutches comprise 1-13 eggs; incubation lasts 23-30 days.

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Photo of male and female mallards walking on ice

Mallard Pair

Adult male mallards are easily identified by their green head, chestnut breast, gray body, black back, and white-bordered blue speculum, which is the wing patch located on the secondary feathers. The females are brownish with an orange bill with dark saddle markings.

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