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Content tagged with "fall wildflower"

Photo of a chicory flower head and buds, grasped in a hand.

Chicory (Blue Sailors) (Flowerhead)

The flowerheads of chicory emerge all along the stems with light blue or white (occasionally pink), strap-shaped ray florets that are toothed at end. It blooms May-October.

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Photo of a chicory leaf with a hand for scale.

Chicory (Blue Sailors) (Leaves)

The basal leaves of chicory resemble those of dandelion, with a prominent center vein, triangular lobes, and deep, rounded sinuses. The leaves become much smaller above the base.

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Photo of Chinese yam showing leaves and bulbils

Chinese Yam

Dioscorea oppositifolia (sometimes called D. batatas)
Similar to kudzu, Chinese yam is an aggressive vine that overtakes nearly everything within reach that stands still long enough! Learn more about this invasive plant—and please don’t plant it!

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Photo of Chinese yam showing leaves and bulbils

Chinese Yam (Bulbils and Leaves)

New vines quickly sprout from the bulbils of Chinese yam. These drop off the vine and are carried to new locations by water or rodents or in topsoil moved for construction purposes. Even a small piece of a bulbil will sprout into a new vine, the way a small piece of a potato can create a new plant. The bulbils can overwinter and form new vines in spring.

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Photo of Chinese yam vine showing bulbils

Chinese Yam (Bulbils)

Although Chinese yam is not known to produce seed in the United States, it produces bulbils, which resemble tiny Irish potatoes and are not technically fruits, in the leaf axils.

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Photo of a pair of Chinese yam leaves

Chinese Yam (Leaves)

The leaves of Chinese yam are usually opposite (sometimes alternate toward branch tips), green, with 7-9 parallel veins, fiddle-shaped or heart-shaped, with pointed tip and two lobes near the base of the leaf.

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Photo of Chinese yam plant showing young foliage

Chinese Yam (New Growth)

The new growth of Chinese yam often has a reddish coloration at the base of the leaves.

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Photo of large mound of Chinese yam vines

Chinese Yam Infestation

Similar to kudzu, Chinese yam is an aggressive vine that overtakes nearly everything within reach that stands still long enough! Learn more about this invasive plant—and please don’t plant it!

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Photo of climbing false buckwheat vines, leaves, and flowers.

Climbing False Buckwheat

Climbing false buckwheat is related to smartweeds, buckwheat, knotweeds, and rhubarb. A vigorous nonwoody vine, it is common in low, moist areas. This patch was photographed along the Katy Trail just north of Jefferson City.

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Photo of climbing false buckwheat mass with flowers.

Climbing False Buckwheat

The flower and fruit clusters of climbing false buckwheat are rather showy, considering it is a rampant vine. This native plant provides shelter and food for wildlife, and it contributes to stabilizing bottomland soils that are prone to flooding.

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