Content tagged with "fall wildflower"

Common Jimsonweed (Thorn Apple)

Photo of common jimsonweed flower
Datura stramonium
Pretty but poisonous, jimsonweed has white goblet-shaped flowers that open around midnight. This native of tropical America was introduced nearly throughout the United States and thrives in disturbed soils. More

Common Jimsonweed (Thorn Apple)

Photo of common jimsonweed flower
Pretty but poisonous, jimsonweed has white goblet-shaped flowers that open around midnight. This native of tropical America was introduced nearly throughout the United States and thrives in disturbed soils. More

Common Ladies’ Tresses (Nodding Ladies’ Tresses)

Photo of common ladies' tresses, flower stalk with spiral flower arrangement
Of the seven species of ladies' tresses in Missouri, this is the most common. The flowers are arranged in a spiral pattern on the upright flowering stem. Each small flower is a little white orchid. More

Common Ladies’ Tresses (Nodding Ladies’ Tresses)

Photo of common ladies' tresses, flower stalk with spiral flower arrangement
Spiranthes cernua
Of the seven species of ladies' tresses in Missouri, this is the most common. The flowers are arranged in a spiral pattern on the upright flowering stem. Each small flower is a little white orchid. More

Common St. John’s-Wort (Klamath Weed)

Photo of common St. John’s-wort flower with spent flowers and fruits
A nearly spent flower cluster, with only one open blossom. Notice that the petals, although withered, usually persist on the seed capsules as the fruits develop. More

Common St. John’s-Wort (Klamath Weed)

Photo of several common St. John’s-wort plants looking like bushes
Common St. John’s-wort has a shrublike, much branched growth habit. A perennial herb with sometimes woody stem bases and leafy shoots, it can grow to be 3 feet tall. More

Common St. John’s-Wort (Klamath Weed)

Photo of common St. John’s-wort flower clusters with spent flowers and fruits
Common St. John’s-wort blooms May–September. The 5 petals are broad at the base, with relatively few black dots, which are usually at or near the margins. The sepals may or may not have a few yellowish-brown to black dots. These may seem like picky details, but they are helpful for distinguishing this from the other 13 species of Hypericum recorded for Missouri. More

Common St. John’s-Wort (Klamath Weed)

Photo of common St. John’s-wort flower with spent flowers and fruits
Hypericum perforatum
In Europe, St. John’s-wort was long used as a medicinal herb and to ward off evil magic. Today, researchers are finding it can treat depression. Yet it poisons livestock and in some places is an invasive weed. More

Common St. John’s-Wort (Leaves)

Photo of common St. John’s-wort leaves
The leaves of common St. John’s-wort are many, crowded, sessile, and opposite. They are linear to oblong, to 1½ inches long. Each pair is positioned at right angles with those above and below (decussate) and have many translucent, sometimes also black, spots. More

Common Sunflower

Photo of common sunflower
Whether you see the wild form or any of the many cultivated varieties, this “poster child” of the sunflower family cultivates its own sunny impression. Common sunflower is also the state flower of Kansas. More